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IndustryArena Forum > CNC Electronics > Servo Motors / Drives > First time energizing new StepperOnline T6 drive
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2024
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    23

    First time energizing new StepperOnline T6 drive

    Hi was wondering if anyone can confirm that my logic is good before I power up for the first time? I just received a new StepperOnline T6 series 1kw servo drive and motor kit. In the video they show someone one powering it using a 24v power supply for testing but the manual says its rated for 220v single phase. What I'm hoping what I can do is power it directly from a 120v wall outlet. Is this ok to do this and what's the draw back of using 120v instead of the rated 220v? Also does it matter what the order is on the neutral an hot leads go on the drive? In the manual all it shows is an L1 and L2 then on the bottom is a ground? Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    4666

    Re: First time energizing new StepperOnline T6 drive

    Hi,
    I use Delta servos which are very similar.

    You hook the incoming AC to L1 and L2. The polarity does not matter.

    My Delta drives and I suspect your also will require a line level AC supply that powers the DC signalling side of the servo, in which case L1 and L2 will be paralleled
    to these inputs.

    My line level AC here in New Zealand is 240VAC and I can hook direct to my drives.....they are rated to 255VAC input. I rather suspect if I tried 120VAC they would still work but I think they would not have the top
    speed that I would expect.

    Certainly do not think there is any harm in trying 120VAC. If it does not work or you get Low Voltage alarms then you'll have to supply 220VAC...end of story.

    Craig

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2024
    Posts
    23

    Re: First time energizing new StepperOnline T6 drive

    Ok thanks, I tried 120v and the drive did not work. Went and built a sketchy dual circuit outlet adapter to get 220v and it started rite up. Left the ground disconnected though because I don't have qualifications of an electrician and 220v scares me that I wont ever have the chance to explain what making a mistake is like with it. Anyways these drives only work when powered to specification. Thanks

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
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    4666

    Re: First time energizing new StepperOnline T6 drive

    Hi,
    the incoming AC voltage is rectified and smoothed by DCLink capacitors.

    If you apply 120VAC the peak voltage is 120 x 1.41 =136.9V. This is what is stored and used by the drive to power the motor, if you like it uses smart electronics to 'chop up' and switch that 136.9VDC
    into AC of variable frequency, voltage and phase to suit the servo motor.

    If you apply 230VAC the peak voltage is 230 x 1.41=324.3V. This is what is stored and used by the drive.

    136.9V is pretty anemic by comparison to 324.3V.

    There are power supplies that can 'boost' the voltage. For instance while the peak voltage of a 230VAC input rectified/smoothed supply is 324.3VDC a boost regulator can push that up to 400VDC and higher. It uses a current switching
    boost inductor, and very clever it is too. Using a circuit like this would allow you to power a device for which your regular AC line is not enough.

    The downside is the extra cost and complexity. Such boost circuits tend to be used for either low power (say 50W or less) supplies where the extra cost is small, OR in high power circuits for which such a boost is absolutely required
    irrespective of the cost.

    Interestingly all PC power supplies are of the 'boost' type. This is done for power factor correction, and is mandatory in the US.....and is therefore an effective world wide standard. The incoming line voltage, anywhere from 100VAC to
    250VAC is rectified, boosted and smoothed to 400VDC. From that 400VDC various buck regulators break it down into 3V, 5V, 12V etc required for the PC. By using a boost circuit means that the device can operate of a very VERY wide range
    of line voltages, a very useful feature indeed allowing the device to be operated in nearly all countries.

    I would not expect entry level servo drives to utilise this boost technology, despite the potential advantages it can offer, it just costs that much more. Therefore it is not surprising that your servo drive will not operate when supplied with such a low
    input voltage. It expects 220VAC....the damn well give it 220VAC. I believe those StepperOnline servos are a bit tender at higher voltages. Over 230VAC they tend to fail. My Delta servos handle 255VAC, which is probably just as well because here in
    New Zealand the normal and natural single phase line voltage is 243VAC. I'd have to use an autotransformer or something to use the StepperOnline units, whereas I can just hook the Delta's direct to the line.

    Craig

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2024
    Posts
    23

    Re: First time energizing new StepperOnline T6 drive

    Ok thanks Craig. I think im going to with my current skills and knowledge in this is going to just run the drive at the specified 220v. I do think I need your assistance though with figuring out how to get 24v and 5v off of a 220v because that's what it looks like im going to have going into my cabinet for now on. I don't want two power lines, one being to power the drive(220v), and one (120v) to power the other 3 drives and controller board. Whats the best way to drop the voltages down so I can get one 24v and a 5v from 220? Thanks

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    4666

    Re: First time energizing new StepperOnline T6 drive

    Hi,
    I personally like to use toroidal transformers, a bridge recitifier, capacitor smoothing and linear regulators. This makes me old school, but they work fine.

    Most people prefer switch mode supplies these days, and to be fair they are damned good, at least the better ones. I'd leave the cheap crappy ones out of consideration, they are just too damn noisy
    electrically speaking.

    Depending on the current level required I would suggest DIN rail mounted supplies. They are versatile and moderately priced. This is an example, 24VDC, 1A output:

    https://nz.element14.com/mean-well/m...-1a/dp/3002954

    Especially if you already have DIN rail mounted circuit breakers and so on they make for a tidy installation.

    Craig

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2024
    Posts
    23

    Re: First time energizing new StepperOnline T6 drive

    Quote Originally Posted by joeavaerage View Post
    Hi,
    I personally like to use toroidal transformers, a bridge recitifier, capacitor smoothing and linear regulators. This makes me old school, but they work fine.

    Most people prefer switch mode supplies these days, and to be fair they are damned good, at least the better ones. I'd leave the cheap crappy ones out of consideration, they are just too damn noisy
    electrically speaking.

    Depending on the current level required I would suggest DIN rail mounted supplies. They are versatile and moderately priced. This is an example, 24VDC, 1A output:

    https://nz.element14.com/mean-well/m...-1a/dp/3002954

    Especially if you already have DIN rail mounted circuit breakers and so on they make for a tidy installation.

    Craig

    Ok great thanks for helping me with all this. So do you think I should get two Mean Well SPM's one 24V and one 5V? See I have 4 stepper drives, one spindle drive, a Raspbery PI v4, and a Mesa 7i96s breakout controller board. The Spindle drive runs directly off the 220v and the 4 stepper drives say they take 24-70v DC 3A. Can I get away with powering all 4 of the 24-70v 3A DC stepper drives from one single 24v Mean Well PSM or should I get a separate one for each drive?

    The 5v Mean Well PSM im sure would power both the Raspbery PI and the 7i96s controller board for there required 5v.

    Also I do have a breaker already in the cabinet I was going to reuse and is still good. I think there's a fuse in there too..

    Again thanks for all your help!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    4666

    Re: First time energizing new StepperOnline T6 drive

    Hi,
    no,no,no, these little DIN rail mount supplies are for low power electronics, the &i96 etc....not the steppers. They require decent power.. If they 24-70V, go with 70V...you'll get the best from them.

    Switchmode power supplies for steppers and/or servos are a mistake, you want a linear supply. This sort of thing, 63VDC 1000W:

    https://www.antekinc.com/ps-10n63-10...-power-supply/

    Craig

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2024
    Posts
    23

    Re: First time energizing new StepperOnline T6 drive

    Quote Originally Posted by joeavaerage View Post
    Hi,
    no,no,no, these little DIN rail mount supplies are for low power electronics, the &i96 etc....not the steppers. They require decent power.. If they 24-70V, go with 70V...you'll get the best from them.

    Switchmode power supplies for steppers and/or servos are a mistake, you want a linear supply. This sort of thing, 63VDC 1000W:

    https://www.antekinc.com/ps-10n63-10...-power-supply/

    Craig
    Ok thanks then I'm going to do some more reach then on the proper power supply for the stepper drives. Going to purchase one of the smaller Mean Wells one for the Raspberry PI and the 7i96s. Again I appreciate all your help. Until next time thanks and take care Craig

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