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IndustryArena Forum > Laser Engraving and Cutting Machines > General Fiber Laser Cutting > First Laser Cutting Machine purchase - any pointers?
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  1. #1
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    First Laser Cutting Machine purchase - any pointers?

    Hi,

    Just joined up here after finding this forum on the weekend. Been reading here ever since.

    I am interested in buying a laser cutting machine. Reading through the threads it looks like Chinese is the way to go for cost savings but with caveats.

    So from reading here it seems the AEON cutters are the ones to go for. I want as big a cutter as I can afford. I have a budget of around 15K USD + shipping and import duties etc.

    I see the MIRA from AEON is recommended. Are the other machines from AEON as good? Better? Worse ? Why is it that the MIRA is recommended? Just because of price perhaps?

    If I were to stick with the MIRA class machine I would go for the MIRA 9060 - specs say a 900x600mm working area (is that the actual max cut area?). So 900 x 600 would be OK. I would prefer a bit bigger cutting area but 900 600 is OK for my first machine.

    What is the max size power on this class of machine? It looks to me as though they max they offer is 100W. I want to cut plywood up to about 12mm/15mm and acrylic sheet up to about 15mm. I may want to do other thing in time but dont know what else I may want to cut at this time. I am sure that owning a machine like this will open up ideas as time goes on!

    From what I have read here, it seems the MIRA is a decent machine. Is the company in China anygood ? Any scams/dishonest practices to watch out for with them?

    Any MIRA users here?

    Thanks for any info

  2. #2
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    Re: First Laser Cutting Machine purchase - any pointers?

    In this price range, GCC would be your best option. When requesting a quote ask them specifically for a DC (glass) laser.

  3. #3
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    Re: First Laser Cutting Machine purchase - any pointers?

    I'm also looking for a AEON Mira laser cutter and I choose the Mira 7045 but can't decide if I should get the RF 30w tube or more powerful water cooled one, need the laser mostly for engraving. Can someone please give suggestions

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Storen View Post
    In this price range, GCC would be your best option. When requesting a quote ask them specifically for a DC (glass) laser.
    Forgive my ignorance, but who is GCC? Are they Chinese? Why do you say ask for a DC laser? Can you maybe give me a url where i can find more information on a DC laser?

    I have read elsewhere that laser cutters can have a tough time cutting ply wood. Does anyone here have any info or experience on that?

    Thanks for any info provided


    Edit: OK found GCC. Based in Taiwan. Higher end Chinese then. Servo motors, so from I have read so far, thats good. What else is it about GCC you like ?
    Last edited by Battery_Powered; 02-13-2019 at 07:55 PM.

  5. #5
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    Re: First Laser Cutting Machine purchase - any pointers?

    Quote Originally Posted by Battery_Powered View Post
    Forgive my ignorance, but who is GCC? Are they Chinese? Why do you say ask for a DC laser? Can you maybe give me a url where i can find more information on a DC laser?

    I have read elsewhere that laser cutters can have a tough time cutting ply wood. Does anyone here have any info or experience on that?

    Thanks for any info provided


    Edit: OK found GCC. Based in Taiwan. Higher end Chinese then. Servo motors, so from I have read so far, thats good. What else is it about GCC you like ?
    It is a higher class machine. Everything will be better - construction, components, software, quality control, support. Currently, GCC offers the best cutting machines in this price range.
    The reason I mentioned to ask for DC is that a high wattage RF laser (good enough for cutting) would be outside your budget. Besides, it is probably going to be an overkill in your case.

  6. #6
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    Re: First Laser Cutting Machine purchase - any pointers?

    Quote Originally Posted by Battery_Powered View Post
    Hi,

    Just joined up here after finding this forum on the weekend. Been reading here ever since.

    I am interested in buying a laser cutting machine. Reading through the threads it looks like Chinese is the way to go for cost savings but with caveats.

    So from reading here it seems the AEON cutters are the ones to go for. I want as big a cutter as I can afford. I have a budget of around 15K USD + shipping and import duties etc.
    Really? That name has never come up in my research. 99% of Chinese laser and CNC machines come from Jinan, but Aeon is based in Jiangsu. That, in itself isn't a problem, because Jiangsu is noted for high-tech electronic assembly, but interesting that this company are 'the ones to go for' yet are outside the traditional laser production area.

    I see the MIRA from AEON is recommended. Are the other machines from AEON as good? Better? Worse ? Why is it that the MIRA is recommended? Just because of price perhaps?

    If I were to stick with the MIRA class machine I would go for the MIRA 9060 - specs say a 900x600mm working area (is that the actual max cut area?). So 900 x 600 would be OK. I would prefer a bit bigger cutting area but 900 600 is OK for my first machine.
    Define your specs - what speed, power, size, of machine you want, then find a manufacturer. You've done it ass-about-face, in my opinion, by finding a manufacturer then choosing a machine they sell. There are a lot of good machinery makers in China. And don't forget, most of these guys are sheet-metal workers, they use off-the-shelf components to assemble their machines. They are all using the same components, or should be.

    Look for some well-known and respected components and ensure your supplier is using them:

    Leadshine for drivers and closed-loop steppers
    Reci for tubes and PSU
    HiWin for transport and bearings
    Trocen for controllers

    Just to name a few. Of course there are others, but those are known, good manufacturers.

    What is the max size power on this class of machine? It looks to me as though they max they offer is 100W. I want to cut plywood up to about 12mm/15mm and acrylic sheet up to about 15mm. I may want to do other thing in time but dont know what else I may want to cut at this time. I am sure that owning a machine like this will open up ideas as time goes on!
    You can fit a W8 tube in one, but it doesn't really make sense. You will need 130-150W (Reci W6) at a minimum to cut 15mm plywood in one pass.

    From what I have read here, it seems the MIRA is a decent machine. Is the company in China anygood ? Any scams/dishonest practices to watch out for with them?

    Any MIRA users here?
    You've read good things, but not from users? Who then?

    And yes, plenty of scams and dishonest vendors. Just be aware of what you're getting. They want your money, most aren't interested in your second business. Support is less important than getting the cash.

    After doing a search, nearly all the positive noise about Aeon is from resellers. Not yet read a single post from an owner.

    Never a good sign.

    If you are really going to be cutting 15mm ply and acrylic, there's a lot of options. You say you want the biggest machine you can get, but then are looking at a 6090, rather than a 1325.

    US$15k gets you a lot of machine.

    I recently got a few quotes for 1390 machines (1300 x 900) with a Reci W6 and they were all around the US$6k mark, delivered.

    Make a questionnaire and send it to a dozen makers:

    What is your maximum cutting size
    Do you support pass-through
    Do you support ethernet/wifi networking
    What make/model of stepper driver
    What make/model of stepper motor
    What make of linear rail
    What make/model of CO2 tube
    What make/model of laser mirror/lens
    What make/model of PSU
    What make/model of controller
    What make/model of chiller
    Do you have interlocks on all openings
    Do you have emergency stop

    etc.

    Think about your day in production and what you want to achieve and how the machine will support that and ask questions accordingly.

    And be cautious of people recommending stuff they don't use themselves.

    I'm researching buying 3-4 laser engraver/cutters right now. three smaller desktop size and a larger 1390 or 1325. As it represents a large capital investment, with a similar further investment in 12 months, if all goes well, I'm in no hurry to jump in bed with a specific manufacturer. I've sent out requests for information to half a dozen manufacturers. Two - well known and often talked about on here - have been given the thumbs down straight away because they have shown an inability to follow basic instructions or to answer questions fully.

    Don't accept half-assed.

    The leading vendor currently is one that is less well-known in the US, but well-known in Australia/New Zealand, which is where I will be based. He's not the cheapest, but is responsive and thorough, which makes me think the company is also responsive and thorough.

    When I've made some bone-headed questions/demands, he's patiently explained why it isn't such a good idea - such as going for a higher-spec chiller with multiple outlets to service two machines. If it goes down, I will have two down machines, not one - doh!

    The other thing he recommended that none of the other vendors did, was to get shipping insurance. At 4% of the shipped price with a $300 excess, it makes sense when you have $12k in the mix.

    I will likely visit the factory before I place the order.

    From a couple of decades of dealing with Chinese suppliers, I can give you a couple of pieces of advice: Don't tell them your budget - or your machine will magically come within your budget. Be specific about what you want - you want a honeycomb and knife table, auto-focus and pass-through, but the machine spec doesn't have it? Just ask. Tell them what you want, let them decide a solution.

    And be specific about getting fully-detailed quotations including part specifications, warranty and support. If they can't or won't give you a full breakdown of the unit, walk away.

  7. #7

    Re: First Laser Cutting Machine purchase - any pointers?

    Quote Originally Posted by Battery_Powered View Post
    Hi,

    Just joined up here after finding this forum on the weekend. Been reading here ever since.

    I am interested in buying a laser cutting machine. Reading through the threads it looks like Chinese is the way to go for cost savings but with caveats.

    So from reading here it seems the AEON cutters are the ones to go for. I want as big a cutter as I can afford. I have a budget of around 15K USD + shipping and import duties etc.

    I see the MIRA from AEON is recommended. Are the other machines from AEON as good? Better? Worse ? Why is it that the MIRA is recommended? Just because of price perhaps?

    If I were to stick with the MIRA class machine I would go for the MIRA 9060 - specs say a 900x600mm working area (is that the actual max cut area?). So 900 x 600 would be OK. I would prefer a bit bigger cutting area but 900 600 is OK for my first machine.

    What is the max size power on this class of machine? It looks to me as though they max they offer is 100W. I want to cut plywood up to about 12mm/15mm and acrylic sheet up to about 15mm. I may want to do other thing in time but dont know what else I may want to cut at this time. I am sure that owning a machine like this will open up ideas as time goes on!

    From what I have read here, it seems the MIRA is a decent machine. Is the company in China anygood ? Any scams/dishonest practices to watch out for with them?

    Any MIRA users here?

    Thanks for any info
    Hi This is Amy from Thunderlaser.
    I recommend our Nova35 machine to you:
    laser-cutter
    Nova35 with working area 900x600mm, 80w and 100w for choice.
    It comes motorized table, hybrid servo motors, air assist, smart board and all accessories needed to set up and run.
    for more detail, you can also send us email: sales@thunderlaser.com
    thanks.
    Attachment 412386
    www.thunderlaser.com

  8. #8

    Re: First Laser Cutting Machine purchase - any pointers?

    Quote Originally Posted by ledaero View Post
    Really? That name has never come up in my research. 99% of Chinese laser and CNC machines come from Jinan, but Aeon is based in Jiangsu. That, in itself isn't a problem, because Jiangsu is noted for high-tech electronic assembly, but interesting that this company are 'the ones to go for' yet are outside the traditional laser production area.



    Define your specs - what speed, power, size, of machine you want, then find a manufacturer. You've done it ass-about-face, in my opinion, by finding a manufacturer then choosing a machine they sell. There are a lot of good machinery makers in China. And don't forget, most of these guys are sheet-metal workers, they use off-the-shelf components to assemble their machines. They are all using the same components, or should be.

    Look for some well-known and respected components and ensure your supplier is using them:

    Leadshine for drivers and closed-loop steppers
    Reci for tubes and PSU
    HiWin for transport and bearings
    Trocen for controllers

    Just to name a few. Of course there are others, but those are known, good manufacturers.



    You can fit a W8 tube in one, but it doesn't really make sense. You will need 130-150W (Reci W6) at a minimum to cut 15mm plywood in one pass.



    You've read good things, but not from users? Who then?

    And yes, plenty of scams and dishonest vendors. Just be aware of what you're getting. They want your money, most aren't interested in your second business. Support is less important than getting the cash.

    After doing a search, nearly all the positive noise about Aeon is from resellers. Not yet read a single post from an owner.

    Never a good sign.

    If you are really going to be cutting 15mm ply and acrylic, there's a lot of options. You say you want the biggest machine you can get, but then are looking at a 6090, rather than a 1325.

    US$15k gets you a lot of machine.

    I recently got a few quotes for 1390 machines (1300 x 900) with a Reci W6 and they were all around the US$6k mark, delivered.

    Make a questionnaire and send it to a dozen makers:

    What is your maximum cutting size
    Do you support pass-through
    Do you support ethernet/wifi networking
    What make/model of stepper driver
    What make/model of stepper motor
    What make of linear rail
    What make/model of CO2 tube
    What make/model of laser mirror/lens
    What make/model of PSU
    What make/model of controller
    What make/model of chiller
    Do you have interlocks on all openings
    Do you have emergency stop

    etc.

    Think about your day in production and what you want to achieve and how the machine will support that and ask questions accordingly.

    And be cautious of people recommending stuff they don't use themselves.

    I'm researching buying 3-4 laser engraver/cutters right now. three smaller desktop size and a larger 1390 or 1325. As it represents a large capital investment, with a similar further investment in 12 months, if all goes well, I'm in no hurry to jump in bed with a specific manufacturer. I've sent out requests for information to half a dozen manufacturers. Two - well known and often talked about on here - have been given the thumbs down straight away because they have shown an inability to follow basic instructions or to answer questions fully.

    Don't accept half-assed.

    The leading vendor currently is one that is less well-known in the US, but well-known in Australia/New Zealand, which is where I will be based. He's not the cheapest, but is responsive and thorough, which makes me think the company is also responsive and thorough.

    When I've made some bone-headed questions/demands, he's patiently explained why it isn't such a good idea - such as going for a higher-spec chiller with multiple outlets to service two machines. If it goes down, I will have two down machines, not one - doh!

    The other thing he recommended that none of the other vendors did, was to get shipping insurance. At 4% of the shipped price with a $300 excess, it makes sense when you have $12k in the mix.

    I will likely visit the factory before I place the order.

    From a couple of decades of dealing with Chinese suppliers, I can give you a couple of pieces of advice: Don't tell them your budget - or your machine will magically come within your budget. Be specific about what you want - you want a honeycomb and knife table, auto-focus and pass-through, but the machine spec doesn't have it? Just ask. Tell them what you want, let them decide a solution.

    And be specific about getting fully-detailed quotations including part specifications, warranty and support. If they can't or won't give you a full breakdown of the unit, walk away.
    Above suggestions are really helpful for newbie, Great!
    www.thunderlaser.com

  9. #9
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    Re: First Laser Cutting Machine purchase - any pointers?

    ....

  10. #10
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    Some great pointers there.

  11. #11
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    Re: First Laser Cutting Machine purchase - any pointers?

    Quote Originally Posted by Battery_Powered View Post
    Some great pointers there.
    Tried to send you a PM, but you’ve either got it turned off or haven’t hit the minimum posts, yet.

  12. #12
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    Hi ledero,

    You offer lots of good points.

    I found the name AEON from this forum. Soren seems to be knowledgeable and he recommends them. So went to do the research. Turkish machine made in China. Some sort of JV maybe? IDK. But certainly seems that the reports here, even from the dealer who seems to like touting for business here, is credible. At least from an outsiders perspective. I would surely feel more comfortable buying from them then Ying.Jing.Dong.Fang.Wu.Ha Co etc. Man who are these little companies?

    My initial approach to this was to buy the largest small machine I could, hence the 900 x 600 table size.

    I was approaching this from the point of view that I know little to nothing about these machines so was looking to buy a 1st machine, a good one though, use it, learn it, then upgrade to a much bigger better machine later.

    That approach lets me learn and see what these machines really can do, cant do and lets me see what I really need for my intended work.

    My confidence level in buying a Chinese product is little to none. I dont have high expectations of anything Chinese - they are not much good in my view. If you want the best you need to buy American or European. Lets hope I am proven wrong, but I highly doubt it, but again lets see.

    I dont have too many specs right now as I dont know what i am looking for, hence a good upper tier brand is a safe bet for me. Cost more yes, but you get more. I dont think many would argue with that logic.

    Out of China I have come to learn I want a Reci Tube. You have filled in some other parts to look for, such as...... HiWin for transport and bearings, Trocen for controllers.

    Good to know, so thanks for that.

    I would be very interested in knowing the machine/s you have selected and why. Also visiting the factory would be an eye opener. Clean tidy well run factory probably points to a better built machine. If they have the mind set to be clean and well run then that probably carries through to the work they do.

    All in all, your points are excellent and will help many people who end up here looking for info on what Chinese machine to buy.

    Thanks for your time, much appreciated.
    Last edited by Battery_Powered; 02-17-2019 at 08:54 AM.

  13. #13
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    Re: First Laser Cutting Machine purchase - any pointers?

    As an example of a decent 'beginner' machine that would do you well as an advanced hobby user, I just ordered a bunch of machines and one of them was a 6090-sized unit (600x900mm - decent working area) with Leadshine 3-Phase steppers, Leadshine stepper controller @36V, Ruida RDC 6442G controller, Reci W4 tube with GY power supply, Taiwanese rail system, steel-reinforced belt, autofocus z-table, S&A CW-5000 chiller, big extractor fan with quality fittings.

    That came to US$2650 to port where I will pay 5% duty and about $150 to ship to my house (port is only 60km away) - Jinan to US door-to-door would be more, but not much more - a few hundred bucks.

    The manufacturer I buy from tends to do most of his business making OEM for other brands, so his quality and QC is high, with low prices. He's been making laser cutters and engravers for over 15 years.

    His 1390-sized machine in 150W (1300 x 900mm, Reci W8 tube) with similar spec hardware but with a CW5200 is around US$6k and that would allow you to feed full ply/mdf/acrylic sheets, using the material pass-through. I seriously considered one, but will hold out for a 1325-size for my own use. This 6090 is for rent/makerspace use.

    So you can see, a budget of $15k can get you a lot of machine.

    If it was me, I would rather pay moderate money for a reliable machine with quality components and use the rest for your infrastructure at home - power, fume extraction, additional computer, etc. than pay top-dollar for something that won't have any better componentry, but has a fancy case and some amorphous 'designed in europe' pedigree.

  14. #14
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    Re: First Laser Cutting Machine purchase - any pointers?

    Aeon aren’t an ‘upper tier brand’. Just because they charge over the odds, doesn’t make them better. Their spec is very much the same as the unit I just bought for ~$3k, who have been ISO compliant since 2004 and making lasers since 1999.

    Do what you want. I’ve been buying machinery from China for over twenty years and have had very few failures.

    If you start out with an attitude that they’re inferior, no doubt you will find reasons to have your opinion vindicated.

  15. #15
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    Re: First Laser Cutting Machine purchase - any pointers?

    Quote Originally Posted by ledaero View Post
    Just because they charge over the odds, doesn’t make them better. Their spec is very much the same
    Comparing laser machines based on the power/size/speed spec would be like comparing restaurants based on the number of calories you are getting and how quickly you can swallow them

    Basically, there are two approaches when buying machines:

    1. You get the best you could justify financially and then adapt your production according to the capabilities of the equipment.

    2. Or approach this the opposite way - define your exact requirements in terms of acceptable tolerances, cycle time etc. and go from there.

    In real production factors such as reliability, potential downtime, fail rate, etc. are often considered more important than the basic spec of the equipment.

    As for AEON Ledaero is right. They are not Turkish. The brand is owned by a Chinese manufacturer called Shanghai Pomelo. As far I know they hired a Turkish industrial design consultancy to help them design a line of machines with a more civilized look. Machines that their clients could install in their offices and design studios without feeling ashamed of the appearance Most of the Chines lasers are scarily ugly and rough. Pomelo is not the first to do that. Several years ago Bodor hired a Swiss design consultancy to help them with the aesthetics of their machines. It appears Pomelo are trying to use slightly higher quality components for their AEON line. The construction of the machines is also slightly better than that of the average Chinese machines. But only slightly. Overall, under the hood, they are very similar. If you want to step up in terms of quality and reliability you need to look at the higher class manufacturers, using more advanced technology (servo, RF, controllers/software, etc.) such as GCC, Trotec, Epilog, ULS, Gravograph.

  16. #16

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    Re: First Laser Cutting Machine purchase - any pointers?

    Hi, I don't know if it's helpful, but if you consider Chinese laser cutting machine, you can search BODOR and visit their website. Contact to their sales or watch cutting videos on Youtube.
    More choices for you man, just search more brands then make decisions.

  17. #17

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    Re: First Laser Cutting Machine purchase - any pointers?

    Hi there,

    Glad to see you are considering an Aeon laser. Yes, I am the touting dealer here in the States, but as much as I love this particular brand of laser, we do sell others and I've been around these machines long enough to know what makes one better than the next. I love our Aeons, but like all the others, you still need to know your way around them, that is if you're looking for something reliable. The factories in China do a great job of assembling the machine and doing it quickly, but if quality is what you seek, that requires a completely different approach.

    As a dealer, we take on a huge amount of responsibility. Not only do we deal with the entire import process, but we put each and every machine through a thorough inspection before we ship them out. Till this day, not a single Chinese machine has come across me that hasn't needed some degree of alteration. Whether its squaring the rails to the gantry or adjusting the entire beam path so that it exits the nozzle at optimal power to simply grounding the machine bodies and making sure Line and Neutral lines are wired correctly, it's always something. Boss, Bodor, Aeon, you name it, they all require a degree of knowledge and some wrenching to work safely as the way they were intended. Some we can get through in a day, others have taken us an entire week to get sorted out, it's really a roll of the dice.

    Many of the guys on this forum are very tech savvy and can navigate through the process fairly easily on their own. However, to the average buyer, who knows nothing about lasers and is expecting to receive a product that's plug and play, it's really best to find someone that handles all of this technical stuff for them and can back up the product with training, tech support and replacement parts when needed. I can't tell you how many emails I get just from this forum alone of people who already own lasers and want us to come out to them to make them work properly. Again, if you know what you're doing, no big deal, but if this is your first time in laser land, brace yourself.

    Back to your original post regarding MIRAs and NOVAs, from what you are describing, the NOVA model is going to be the better fit. MIRAs are desktop lasers and AEON designed them more for engraving purposes and not so much for cutting. The MIRA9 you were talking about sort of bridges the gap between the two, but won't offer the amount of power you are needing. With your budget, you can get into a NOVA10 (1000 x 700) or NOVA14 (1400 x 800) laser with more than enough power. Along with the added wattage, they will also provide down draft exhaust systems which are essential for cutting applications, especially with something as flammable as plywood, due to all the glue that ignites between layers. Both models are in stock here in our Florida warehouse and will include free startup training and unlimited technical support. We get visitors in our showroom all the time, and if you're willing, I encourage you to take a quick trip down here to see them both in person. If you decide to purchase either one, we will even reimburse you for your air fare (within reason).

    <img src="http://www.engraving-machines-plus.com/assets/images/showroom1.jpg" alt="Showroom1" width=426 height=240><img src="http://www.engraving-machines-plus.com/assets/images/showroom2.jpg" alt="Showroom2" width=426 height=240>
    <img src="http://www.engraving-machines-plus.com/assets/images/showroom3.jpg" alt="Showroom3" width=426 height=240><img src="http://www.engraving-machines-plus.com/assets/images/showroom4.jpg" alt="Showroom4" width=426 height=240>

    I have helped many people on this forum with their machine purchases; however, most people just use the forum for advice and don't circle back around to share their experience. I'm sure I can reach out to a few of them and with their consent, can provide you with some excellent referrals. We are not the cheapest company, but we are honest and really pride ourselves in the after sales support which many others ignore. I would really enjoy speaking with you more on this topic and answering any other questions you might have. Feel free to reach out to me during the week or whenever it's convenient for you. I promise you won't be disappointed.


    Danny Martinez
    Engraving Machines Plus, Corp.
    (321) 821-7774
    danny@engravingmachinesplus.com
    Melbourne, FL

    <img src="http://www.engraving-machines-plus.com/assets/images/EMP_Logo_2_Small.png" alt="321-821-7774">

  18. #18

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    Re: First Laser Cutting Machine purchase - any pointers?

    Since we're on the topic and I have spent the last 2 years with my head inside several AEON machines, I think it's up to me to give them the credit they deserve. Aside from using the same software, controller, drivers and a few other common Chinese components, the AEON line is vastly different than your typical Chinese laser. The Turkish company redesigned many of the "off the shelf" components that you would find in most lasers and modeled them after the American machines.

    Functionality has greatly increased. For example, the AEON MIRAs can scan at up to 1200 mm/sec and 1000 mm/sec on the NOVA. Not many Chinese machines exceed 400 mm/sec with their heavy laser heads and sluggish stepper motors. I you look at the drive motors, they are double stacked and full of torque. Plus the MIRA model has a super light weight laser head that mimics the engineering you would find in a Trotec or Epilog.

    Another great feature of the AEON line is that they enclosed all of their linear rails in a way where no debris or soot can accumulate inside them. Again, this is customary of American machines where everything is neatly encased. If you look at most Chinese machines, all of the linear rails are exposed and many of them have the driving components sitting right at the rear of the cabinet instead of out back where the laser tube is installed. This is why AEON gives you a 3 year warranty on the linear motion system. With plywood being as messy as it is, having this upgrade will prevent a whole lot of maintenance and ensure these components do not break down prematurely.

    Yes, the body of the machines are nice looking, but it's not anything to do with making them less shameful. If you take the two front panels off either model, you're looking at a cube, nothing fancy. If you really want to appreciate what they've done, you have to really look at the innovations. For example. the MIRA has all built in components. I just had the new MIRA9 come in and its got the WJ5000 chiller built right in along with the air pump and exhaust fan. The lids of the machines are going to tempered glass now and soon all of the MIRAs will be rolled out as Class 1 lasers with keyed ignitions. They've even added a relay to the Y Driver so that switching between flat and rotary happens upon connection of the rotary device. While they are pretty to look at, the entire design was aimed at function not form. The airflow is spectacular in these machines and with the beefed up 700W fan they pack with the NOVAs, you really ensure every last bit of smoke is cleared out immediately.

    There's still not many pictures out there of the AEON machines, so if you haven't laid hands on them personally, it's hard to really talk about what they have to offer. However, if you spend a day with one and really stick your head inside, you will be pleasantly surprised. Best of all, AEON is only on their second generation of improvements. There are tons of new things on the way and I have a feeling this company will out shine many of its Chinese competitors. So far everyone of our customers has been thrilled. Some went with the MIRA over the Glowforge and others went with a NOVA over the Boss. At the end of the day we can choose to sell any brand we want, but from where we sit, no one in China is offering a better package.


    Danny Martinez
    Engraving Machines Plus, Corp.
    (321) 821-7774
    danny@engravingmachinesplus.com
    Melbourne, FL

    <img src="http://www.engraving-machines-plus.com/assets/images/EMP_Logo_2_Small.png" alt="321-821-7774">

  19. #19
    Registered
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    115

    Re: First Laser Cutting Machine purchase - any pointers?

    Is it worth the $12,000 difference you charge over my ShenHui?

    That came with hybrid Leadshine steppers and motion control drivers @36V, a Reci W6, a genuine HY PSU, quality Taiwanese sealed rails, great airflow and a European-designed cabinet, wiring and keyed lockout.

    For just over $3k.

    Sure, it doesn’t have tempered glass or a three-year warranty, but it was $3k.

    I could have optioned servos and a higher-spec multi-mode cooler for under a grand difference in price.

    For the kind of money Bodor and Aeon are charging I could have gotten servos and a high-powered RF or fibre laser.

    Ive been around lasers since the early 90s and motion-control systems since the early noughts and I can’t see where all the money goes.

  20. #20
    Registered
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    334

    Re: First Laser Cutting Machine purchase - any pointers?

    Quote Originally Posted by ledaero View Post
    European-designed cabinet
    Which model comes with this cabinet? Could you please show a picture?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dmart321 View Post
    I am the touting dealer here in the States
    Nice looking showroom! The interior architect you hired definitely knows what he/she is doing. I wish more dealers do that instead of asking their wives and secretaries to pick the furniture and colors.

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