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IndustryArena Forum > Events, Product Announcements Etc > Videos > Didn't know you could mill hardened steel this smoothly.
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  1. #1
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    Didn't know you could mill hardened steel this smoothly.

    I can't imagine butter would mill any quieter. Simply amazing.
    Slotting 54hrc at 2x tool dia.

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dyN3nxcQadk"]YouTube- NX-NVD Fraisa end mill machining hardened H-11 at 54 HRC; Full Slots, last pass 2 x's D[/ame]



    P.S. Santa Clause, if your listening, I would sure like a set of them Fraisa tools.

  2. #2
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    Hi xy_eezy

    It does not have to be Fraisa tools to do this there are many good carbide endmills that will do this

    It also helps to have a niece ridgid machine, In a controlled set up like that it always looks easy

    H11/H13 machine very well at that hardness

    But a good demo for there tools
    Mactec54

  3. #3
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    As mactec54 comments that is not terribly unusual but it is a good demonstration of what can be done with modern tooling. My guess is that it is a TiAlN coated tool, these can give awesome performance when cutting with a powerful air blast. If you look carefully the chips appear to be coming off a bluish color. Under these cutting conditions most of the heat generated in the cutting remains in the chip; there is simply not enough time for much heat to transfer by conduction to the tool or workpiece. Because the chip gets so hot at actually loses hardness so the cutting load can be less than occurs when the cutter is running slower. The big problem with running like this is if you do overdo it or let the tool get dull things go downhill in a big way very quickly.
    An open mind is a virtue...so long as all the common sense has not leaked out.

  4. #4
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    Their DURACUT coating is (TiAlN) for dry cutting hard stuff, they also have a UNICUT 4-X coating (TiAlCN) for hard milling with coolant.

    And like all manufactures of high preformance end mills they use a better grade of carbide to start with.

    Like already said the 50Rc range is getting to be old news, we buy a 3/8 square ended EM for $19 and use it on 58Rc A2 and S7, now the fun starts in the 60 to 70 range.

  5. #5
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    I am kinda new at CNC milling, about 1 1/2 years and most of that is drilling holes in aluminum tubes. We have a Fryer mill with Anilam controls. Could someone give me an idea of the RPM and feedrate that video was done at? I would love to be able to do machining like that but need a good starting point on feeds and speeds.
    thanks!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlmkr38 View Post
    Could someone give me an idea of the RPM and feedrate that video was done at?
    !
    best is to check with the tool sales or the factory for the recommended speeds and feeds for any given tool , it all boils down to the tool and its capabilities , a standard coated end mill won't withstand the same a variable flute with the same coating , people can give you generic spees and feeds but it won't be optimal and will shorten your tool life
    heres a flier for the CGS variables that i deal with , at the bottom is the speed and feed chart , it'll give you some idea of the sfm you can run at
    http://www.cgstool.com/Catalog/HV_Flyer-Complete.pdf
    also your speeds and feeds will obviously be affected by rigidity in the workpiece and the machine , also cat40 or cat50 can be night and day difference , etc
    A poet knows no boundary yet he is bound to the boundaries of ones own mind !! ........

  7. #7
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    Re: Didn't know you could mill hardened steel this smoothly.

    Quote Originally Posted by Andre' B View Post
    Their DURACUT coating is (TiAlN) for dry cutting hard stuff, they also have a UNICUT 4-X coating (TiAlCN) for hard milling with coolant.

    And like all manufactures of high preformance end mills they use a better grade of carbide to start with.

    Like already said the 50Rc range is getting to be old news, we buy a 3/8 square ended EM for $19 and use it on 58Rc A2 and S7, now the fun starts in the 60 to 70 range.
    Very nice.. can anyone give me some advice on cutting a AR15 bolt. I think it's like HRC 60.
    I need to mill off about an Inch of it.
    I have a X2 mill so I know that is a limitation but the carbide end mill I have , they are cheap ones, don't hardly scratch it..

    Sent from my XT1635-01 using Tapatalk

  8. #8
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    Re: ???? Didn't know you could mill hardened steel this smoothly.

    Quote Originally Posted by CAMachinist View Post


    Check this cool video:

    Machining 60 Rockwell Steel with the Tormach! WW166
    The A2 he is machining is not hardened

    The 1-2 -3 block is only case hardened the Case is around .030 deep on average so once you are through the case it's not much different than milling 1018 mild steel
    Mactec54

  9. #9

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    Re: Didn't know you could mill hardened steel this smoothly.

    Can do this with any coated carbide tool, even the cheap ones from China. The demo is certainly nice, although what they don't tell you is you'll have to replace that tool hourly at that DOC and those F&S.
    Same old same old marketing techniques. Love it!

  10. #10
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    Re: Didn't know you could mill hardened steel this smoothly.

    64 Rocwell…….. kid's stuff, try turning a carbide shank with some CBN inserts.

    If you go on UTUBE and browse Stefan Gotteswinter's video series you will see where he machined a tungsten carbide tool shank on a lathe with a CBN insert.

    I would not recommend this in a home workshop or elsewhere as the swarf that comes off is like fine cast iron chippings and is second to diamond in hardness so your lathe bed will suffer big time without adequate protection..... and your lungs too...….but it can be done for whatever reason you have.

    Thinking outside of the box for a second, and I think the swarf would make an excellent lapping compound, but you can buy diamond lapping grit quite cheaply on EBAY so no need to mess with it.

    I have a project to turn .25mm off of an ER32 tool holder with a hardened straight tool shank of 32mm diam (only very thin and mildly case hardened) to reduce it to 1-1/4" diam and I purchased a couple of CBN inserts to do it.....turns out the shank is only mildly hard and a file can scratch it with ease, so a normal carbide insert will do the trick.
    Ian.

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