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  1. #1
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    Bought the wrong voltage motor, any change possible?

    I bought several small servo motors off ebay. Didn't know they were rated at 320v. Is there anyway to make them run off 120v? Thanks.

  2. #2
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    nvm

  3. #3

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    HereinCS

    What are these motors, that is a strange voltage, post some photos, they won't run from 120v very well, unless you have the drives, & maybe a step up transformer 120v to 320v for the drive
    Mactec54

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  5. #5
    Super Moderator Al_The_Man's Avatar
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    That voltage is commonly used to allow rectifying 240ac which results in a suitable DC voltage supply for the drives.
    They look like nice motors.
    Al.
    CNC, Mechatronics Integration and Custom Machine Design

    “Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.”
    Albert E.

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    Sorry, but what do mean by rectifying 240v?

  7. #7

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    HereinCS

    You will have to get the drive to run them, or make something up, the motor you have is only 150watts & would only be good for a very light small machine, I could not see anything on the encoder, & the motor voltage is 320V DC not AC ,as I said in the above post, if you only have 120vac you will have to get a transformer to step up to the voltage the drive would need, But most likely the drive would need a 220v supply or more
    Mactec54

  8. #8
    Super Moderator Al_The_Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HereinCS View Post
    Sorry, but what do mean by rectifying 240v?
    By rectifying 240vac results in ~340vdc, drives can be obtained with internal P.S., in this case 240vac input, otherwise external rectification would have to be obtained or built.
    The AMC drives I use have both options.
    I also see the ebayer has the drives available, according to the listing.
    Although the label specifies the DC voltage, they appear to be AC servo's.
    The biggest problem with mix and matching AC servo's and drives is getting a match for the commutation method used by the motor.
    Al.
    CNC, Mechatronics Integration and Custom Machine Design

    “Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.”
    Albert E.

  9. #9
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    yes, these will run on 120vac - AS LONG AS YOU BUY A 120VAC INPUT SERVO DRIVE that will work with this AC brushless motor. most of our servodrives will accept 30vdc thru 460vac 1 or 3 ph. Your motor is rated for 320vdc, or 230vac said another way, and its max speed rating happens at this voltage. Any lower voltage will simply lower the max speed linearly. So at 120Vac, or said differently , 160vdc, it will only go 1/2 as fast as the nameplate states. At 24vdc it will go that much slower.

    but you do know you need a DRIVE between the ac or dc input voltage to make these kind of motors work,, right? you cannot plug it into the 120vac wall socket....

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    Thanks Mike for the explanation. The seller also have the drive for this unit. It's rated at 230v AC nominal. I can get to 220v only, and only in my garage. If I buy a 110v drive from say, Viper or any other brand, will it still work? Are the wiring for the motor and encoder fairly standard so that I can buy any driver?

  11. #11
    Super Moderator Al_The_Man's Avatar
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    As I mentioned, with mix and matching drives, it is not so much the encoder as the commutation tracks, now usually also included on the encoder disk, as long as the motor do not have resolvers, you may be OK with encoder disk commutation, if the motors have this.
    You will then have to phase either the stator windings or the commutation pulses so they coincide.
    Al.
    CNC, Mechatronics Integration and Custom Machine Design

    “Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.”
    Albert E.

  12. #12
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    u gotta be sure of the specs of motor and drive; ur link on motor data did not say details on encoder so we cant say whether another brand drive would work with the motor. Most 230v drives will also work on 120v, some 3phase drives will work on 1phase but not all. 220, 230, & 240v are identical as far as drives is concerned. Also some drives are limited in how many poles they will run (ie, we have 64 & 128pole motors and most generic drives won't run them without tricks played.

    Most motors like the one you posted on use generic TTL a quad b encoders that are standard from drive to drive. There are other type encoders like absolute ones, endat, Steggman, hyperphase, 1Vpp sine, etc that require special drive encoder inputs. So what I am saying is we cannot tell u if a generic drive will run your motor without full motor and drive specs. Since we sell little motors and drives like this I can tell u you should be able to find a drive for around $ 300.00

    Post full motor (and drive if u want) specs and some of us will tell u if compatible....

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