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IndustryArena Forum > Other Machines > Printing, Scanners, Vinyl cutting and Plotters > ideas for those trying to build '3d printers'
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  1. #1
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    ideas for those trying to build '3d printers'

    while i am not sure you can use such a technique to directly make 3d parts, there is a interesting idea that ive read about.. i think its been built to prototype stage.. anyhow this is how it works:

    1. a laser printer prints a cross section of a 3d model on a sheet of acrylic film

    2. the film is advanced over a thin pool of UV curing polymer.

    3. a bright light exposes the thin layer of polymer through the acrylic mask

    4. the pool of polymer gets filled to just higher than before, and another mask is printed and moves over the pool

    5. the light exposes the parts and it is again flooded with a thin layer of polymer.


    this idea is being explored commercially somewhere, by some inventor type.. to me it wastes alot of acrylic sheeting... it is also similar to another interesting rapid prototype method..

    1. a 3d model is cut into slices.

    2. a plotter holding adhesive backed paper, and holding a xacto, cuts the cross sections.

    3. a bored person peels the slices and adheres them to one another.

    4. finish like a wooden model...

    this has the advantages of creating geometry no 3d milling machine could... the disadvantages are numerous and obvious, but the main one is that it will never work for many forms, and the models must then be finished with more traditional model-making techniques. plus its time intensive.


    i still think using hacked inkjet hardware and software along with a z-corp style power binder would work.. the other option is to design and build a atomizer or simialr inkjet head.. this is also possible. especially because you could almost certainly get someone here with an accurate cnc mill to cut the small parts free or cheaply.. the parts would machine very quickly because it would mostly be small channels and nozzles in a tiny piece of brass or something.

    all right, good luck..

    robert
    Design & Development
    My Portfolio: www.robertguyser.com | CAD Blog I Contribute to: http://www.jeffcad.info

  2. #2
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    another few ideas.. there are 'selective sintering machines out there, which use a small laser to cure or melt plastic that has been deposited in a thin, layer.. this is not completely absurd to try for an experimenter.. maybe even the easiest project.. the hard part is finding the right laser/uv ploymer combo..

    another idea.. use a hot glue gun with a very thin nozzle and an accurate way of metering out hot material.. this would be an additive process, which many machines use. the hard part here is figuring out a 'wash away' bonder that can be used to fill gaps, but will also wash away.. maybe some sort of plaster in an extruder.. or some sort of... yeah.. i dunno.. but there are ideas out there if you research it..

    for me, i am going to be returning home soon and fixing my little painter guy, right before building a large 8' x axis , 4' z axis, and a y axis on wheels that can hold a can of that expan ding foam insulation stuff and make huge shapes... another art project.

    ciao
    Design & Development
    My Portfolio: www.robertguyser.com | CAD Blog I Contribute to: http://www.jeffcad.info

  3. #3
    Moderator ynneb's Avatar
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    Hey Vaccy see this thread, unfortunately it dissapeared into the abyss quite some time ago. Lots of nice pics http://www.cnczone.com/forums/showth...ighlight=rapid

  4. #4
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    I like these ideas!

    -niko

  5. #5
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    Robert,
    I saw something on the Discovery Channel that might interest you. Don't have a link for it though.

    They were using something like an inkjet that sprayed a very fine white powder. The powder created the 3D model.

    To the best of my memory, here is how it worked.

    3D cad drawing was created with very thin slices in the X direction.
    The powder inkjet sprayed a thin layer of powder such a printing a slice of the 3d drawing.

    Now, the cool part:
    The base that the 3d model was created on was lowered by some amount equal to the thickness of the powder sprayed as above.

    Next pass, .......... Base lowered .......... Created solid white 3D model out of the powder. It could be handled after sitting for about 5 minutes, but was put in some type oven to cure.

    Was very facinating. No liquids, No Mess. Was pretty fast for the process.
    Wish I had other info to offer.

    I would like to build one of these, but do not have any info on the materials used, etc. Would be easy to build if one could spray the powder.

    Jerry

  6. #6
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    Something very different

    I read (I think) in wired magazine a while back that some bio-geek used a x-y-z setup similar to Jerry's idea. Those different wells were loaded with different types of living cells, similar to an inkjet printer. The 3-D image was injected by micro needles into a nutrient rich agar gel. Once complete the printed gel was put into an incubator for a few days. Giving the cells time to grow and adhere to each other. The gel cell image was cut out and rinsed in warm water to dissolve the agar and what was left was presumably pseudo-tissue.

  7. #7
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    Been looking into ths for a while..Going to try
    http://www.sci-spot.com/Mechanical/3dprinter.htm
    Now this is really cool: http://www.zcorp.com/products/zcast.asp
    Spray the cast and pour...

  8. #8
    Moderator ynneb's Avatar
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    Nice links jpogriff,

    While most of this video is an add, you will see some interesting things too.


    HERE

  9. #9
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    ynneb,

    Thanks for the link they are actually up the rode from me. I am trying to get a tour. I will be attempting the inkjet in the next couple of days, let you know how I make out.

  10. #10
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    I have machined parts for these machines in the past.
    http://www.3dsystems.com/products/multijet/index.asp
    I got to see their latest machine in action in the plant.. Pretty impressive
    Gary

  11. #11
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    What type of laser printer you would recommend me for my UV curing polymer but i like your idea as well. I looked over 3D Printer Reviews from several websites and then selected one of them. https://www.allthat3d.com/best-3d-printer/

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