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  1. #73
    Registered
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    54
    Hello, just thought I'd post a quick update. Haven't been able to do much on the CNC due to all my time being spent finishing off my degree.

    I've brought some end mills and finished my designs for my cable carrier mounts to hold/support the cable chain to the machine. I've also got the designs finished that will replace temporary parts on the machine.

    I'll post some pictures when I get some work finished but until then I put together two videos showing the process of building my CNC machine. Figured it was much nicer than reading through a post and loading all the images. Also most all the pictures in the video are narrated so you can understand whats going on.

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yLfHb9LRWuc]Building my CNC Router - Part I - YouTube[/ame]

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HE0xENr-Uwk]Building my CNC Router - Part II - YouTube[/ame]
    http://www.cnc4everyone.com - Help and articles on everything CNC
    http://www.joshendyblog.net - My personal blog with in-depth info on all my projects

  2. #74
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    5515
    Cool videos! And once again, great build!

  3. #75
    Registered
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1176
    Great build I like it and I second it cool videos..


    Lou
    http://www.cnczone.com/forums/diy-cnc-router-table-machines/140832-cnc-software.html

  4. #76
    Registered
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    1876
    Great build and videos. I really like the method you used to bond your tubes.

    Since you are gathering ideas for another router anyway, my suggestions:
    - Try to design the frame so it also becomes an enclosure for the router. (dust, noise)
    - Consider making a fixed gantry / moving table design version if the goal is stiffening it up
    - In theory, if you run the vertical tubes on the sidewalls all the way to the bottom, this is slightly better than ending them on the side of the lower tube. Not a big deal though.
    - Some people like to keep all of the screws, etc covered to keep the dust out.

    Easier said than done. Nonetheless, I really like your build.

    Take care.

    Harry

  5. #77
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    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    54
    Thanks for the compliments! I really liked watching the videos myself, good reminder of how much work and time I put into this machine.

    Quote Originally Posted by harryn View Post
    Great build and videos. I really like the method you used to bond your tubes.

    Since you are gathering ideas for another router anyway, my suggestions:
    - Try to design the frame so it also becomes an enclosure for the router. (dust, noise)
    - Consider making a fixed gantry / moving table design version if the goal is stiffening it up
    - In theory, if you run the vertical tubes on the sidewalls all the way to the bottom, this is slightly better than ending them on the side of the lower tube. Not a big deal though.
    - Some people like to keep all of the screws, etc covered to keep the dust out.

    Easier said than done. Nonetheless, I really like your build.

    Take care.

    Harry
    Thanks for the tips, I've noted them down. My next build will be very different to this one. When I get the room I'll be retrofitting a mill and create much bigger, beefier parts for the new CNC. I'll also be constructing a steel frame and using much higher quality components like ball screws, thk linear rails and water cooled spindle.

    That will be a few years off yet, but who knows... I can get really impatient sometimes!
    http://www.cnc4everyone.com - Help and articles on everything CNC
    http://www.joshendyblog.net - My personal blog with in-depth info on all my projects

  6. #78
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    May 2009
    Posts
    54
    I managed to get some time in the workshop yesterday. Got some 25mm thick HDPE down on the table and cut out a bunch of spacers that I'll be using to mount the long lengths of L shaped aluminium extrusion to the machine which the cable carriers will ride along.

    Again thought I'd make a video. This video shows some cool angles of the CNC while cutting and you can see how effective the flexible clear PVC dust skirt works at containing the chips. Even with my cheap dust vac, when the dust shoe gets low enough it picks up all the chips/dust surrounding the cut.

    The clear PVC has already proven its use. When doing my first cut I forgot to properly tighten the collet and while running the profile toolpath the tool popped out! I saw sparks through the clear PVC and immediately bashed the E-stop button I've got mounted on the wall next to me.

    If I hadn't seen the sparks I'm not so sure I would have noticed anything went wrong. Couldn't hear anything through my ear muffs and the dust vac running loudly as always.

    I was very lucky, the tool managed a pretty quick escape from the collet and nothing was damaged. The sparks were from the collet nut spinning across the tip of the end mill which was stuck in the material. Even more amazing the job wasn't ruined and I was able to return to zero and continue the cut (with the end mill properly secured this time)

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-aC_eW1pggg]CNC Router - Cutting HDPE plastic - YouTube[/ame]
    http://www.cnc4everyone.com - Help and articles on everything CNC
    http://www.joshendyblog.net - My personal blog with in-depth info on all my projects

  7. #79
    Registered
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    54
    Hi, thought I'd post another update. Haven't been doing to much lately, been busy finishing University and unfortunately just recently have been diagnosed with an eye disease called Keratoconus. I've got eye surgery next week to help stop the progression of the disease so I decided to spend some time in the workshop to take my mind of it.

    I found my little cross laser I had laying around for a few months which I had intended to use as a quick zeroing system for the CNC. I already had the mounting hole in the spindle mount so I thought I'd wire it up and see how it works.

    Took longer than I'd thought. Bloody wires broke off the laser and I had to resolder some new wires. Also ended up adding a M5 grub screw to lock the laser in place.

    Here's a quick video showing how it looks:

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d1h3mpoVXpE]CNC - Zeroing Cross Laser - YouTube[/ame]
    http://www.cnc4everyone.com - Help and articles on everything CNC
    http://www.joshendyblog.net - My personal blog with in-depth info on all my projects

  8. #80
    Registered
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    1028
    Nice video. Good luck with your surgery.

  9. #81
    Registered
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    16
    Hello joshendy
    Where did you buy CNC parts?

  10. #82
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    May 2009
    Posts
    54
    Quote Originally Posted by DonFrambach View Post
    Nice video. Good luck with your surgery.
    Thanks, I appreciate it!

    Quote Originally Posted by testpilot View Post
    Hello joshendy
    Where did you buy CNC parts?
    If you see my first post on this topic I have a large write up and mention in there some of the places I brought parts. A big part of the machine is the linear carriages from cncrouterparts.com
    http://www.cnc4everyone.com - Help and articles on everything CNC
    http://www.joshendyblog.net - My personal blog with in-depth info on all my projects

  11. #83
    Registered
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    54
    Small update. Recently got myself some new couplings for my CNC. Previously I had jaw type Lovejoy couplings, they were really useless. Good for power transfer but they had a lot of backlash. I had some semi-successful attempts at removing the backlash but I've decided to move on from them.

    If you're reading this and thinking of getting Lovejoy jaw type couplings dont do it! Get a one piece zero backlash flexible coupling instead. I managed to get three for $23 USD on ebay, very cheap. They seem a little brittle and weak or maybe its just I'm used to the heavier steel Lovejoy couplings.

    Here's a video of them on the CNC:
    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WQ7iF5_MTZk]CNC Router - New Flexible Couplings - YouTube[/ame]

    You can read more about the couplings on my blog that I've just recently started:
    Joshendy's Blog » New Couplings for CNC
    http://www.cnc4everyone.com - Help and articles on everything CNC
    http://www.joshendyblog.net - My personal blog with in-depth info on all my projects

  12. #84
    Registered
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    783
    I just swapped out helical couplers to oldham style to get rid of backlash.... Went from 14 steps of compensation to 3. 3 steps is .00075"


    Used lovejoy in the past and just put heat shrink over the ears to make the spider a tight fit with no issues.

    If your leadscrews are easy to turn by hand the helicals will be fine except under heavy loads they tend to twist/lag a bit.

    The oldhams are very nice, but were $30 each.

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