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View Poll Results: Height of 4ft x 8ft CNC from floor to work surface/table top ?

Voters
38. You may not vote on this poll
  • 22 inches floor-table top

    0 0%
  • 24 inches floor-table top

    0 0%
  • 28 inches floor-table top

    2 5.26%
  • 30 inches floor-table top

    7 18.42%
  • 32 inches floor-table top

    13 34.21%
  • 36 inches floor-table top

    16 42.11%

Thread: CNC Height?

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  1. #1
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    CNC Height?

    I've been thinking. I first designed my machine to have a height of 30 inches, from floor to top of table.

    Now, I'm thinking of , well, rethinking that. I remember the Weeke machine I operated for a few months was shorter then that, perhaps maybe 22 inch from floor to top.

    WHat do you all think. It's a full size, 4ft x 8 ft CNC. What do you think is standard height of a full size machine?

  2. #2
    Community Moderator ger21's Avatar
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    34697
    I've never measured it, but our Morbidelli with 5x12 vacuum table is around 36".
    The older Masterwood I used to use, with pods and rails, was lower, probably similar to the Weeke.

    I think that with larger parts, it's easier to load (for one person) if the table is a little higher.

    For my limited space, I keep my table just below table saw height, so it's not in the way.
    Gerry

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  3. #3
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    I designed my current machine to sit 32" off of the floor. I am about 6'3" for me, 32" is where my hands are when I am standing straight up. For a 4x8 machine, this is more important as too high and you have to sort of throw the material up on the table. Too low and you will always be bent over the machine. 36" would be too tall for most people. At work our 4x8 laser is about 34" high, when we had a 4x8 techno-isel, it was built to be 28" high, but we added a 6" footing to bring it up to 34" so all surfaces were the same height.

  4. #4
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    My latest re-design, and rebuild included adjustable table height. I have it set up right now, at it's lowest position of about 32" table surface to floor. However, the addition of an end of table mounting assembly (to accomodate cutting things like dove tail joints in the ends of boards to be joined) made it desirable to have the ability to increase the table height (and accomodate longer board lengths, in so doing) up to 48". Of course, adjusting to this height would make for a very unstable table. So I have it set up at 32" and plan to leave it there. (Even though it IS possible to raise it as high as 48").

  5. #5
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    My mythical 3'x4' machine is planned to have a 36" table so that I won't be bending over. I'm of average height. I'm interested to hear from people that have shorter tables. Why shorter? Just loading heavy stuff?

  6. #6
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    If you're space constrained, you may want to consider a taller table for storage.

    When I built the table for my 4 x 5 ft ShopBot about 10 years ago, I made its table height 42" because I needed the space underneath it for storage. One side has sixteen 28" full extension drawers, the other side has nine 28" full extension drawers (all filled). One end has a rack where I store clamps. The other end has adjustable shelves for additional storage.

    It is a compromise. I'm only 5'9" so I need to stand on a 3 step ladder to reach across the table. I can only load plywood sheets from one end but that hasn't been a problem for the work I've done.

    Here's a couple of photos to show what I've done:Attachment 181785Attachment 181786

  7. #7
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    I suppose to answer the question of "Why shorter?" Because the taller it is, the more reinforcements you will need to stabilize the machine from rocking during use. However, it all depends on what all you wish to design your machine to do. Taller has the advantage of being able to add a clamping mechanism to one end of the table, so that you can use it to do things like cutting dovetail joints into the ends of planks. This involves limitations on how long the planks can be, which are determined by two things: Z axis travel, and table height. The ability to move the X axis (or Y depending on how you design your orientation) to be able to move the router a few inches BEYOND the edge of the table also come into play here. Personally, I stand 5'11'' and my table height (at it's lowest setting) is 30" from the floor. I use the channel steel of the lower portion of the frame to step up onto, when reaching across the machine while clamping work onto the table surface. My table measures 22" wide (Y) x 48" long (X) and my Z axis travel is 13". I also have a 4th axis built parallel to the X axis along the edge of the table, so that I can use the machine like a combination Mill, Lathe, and dovetail jointer. It is good, that you are asking these questions BEFORE you build. And inevitable, that you will probably rebuild, and redesign many times before you are happy with your machine. Personally, I have disassembled, redesigned, and rebuilt mine 4 times since it's initial construction! The best advice I can offer along these lines, is to make a list of things "You wish You had done", and improvements needed which involve disassembly of your machine in order to accomplish. This list will no doubt grow, the more you use your machine. So WAIT, until you have obtained all the parts and components needed for any changes in design before you take the step of disassembling to make the changes. (I.E. the object is to rebuild only ONCE). Good luck with that! For as time goes on, and you see other's designs, or perhaps your own imagination kicks in, your machine will probably end up just like everyone else's: in a constant state of developement.

  8. #8
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    My machine ended up at 38" height because I added taller casters than originally planned. But after using it for over a year I would not want to have it any lower. Really convenient to work on and look at details standing straight.

  9. #9
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    My benches and table saw are all at about 32". It feels real comfortable so it seemed reasonable to make the router surface at 32"

  10. #10
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    I had my router at or just above standard table height when I started, about 80 cm. I then added a torsion box bringing it up to about 95cm (close to 3') and found it really comfy. I think it has to do with the size of parts you make and stock you use.

    I make small parts from small stock so this set up is nice. If I were to get a big router it would probably be for sheets of ply and then 30" might be better.
    Sven
    http://www.puresven.com/?q=building-cnc-router

  11. #11
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    My router is actually about 42" high at the table. I am 6' 5" though, so I am leary about having anything at the normal average height. I get tension in my lower back when I have to do a lot of bending over. I generally make everything a little higher.
    Lee

  12. #12
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    Re: CNC Height?

    I voted for 32 inches but I have to say this, it would largely depend upon what you are doing with the machine. If you are primary processing sheet goods I would think that a lower table would be easier to load but maybe harder to unload. If you are working on thick slabs of lumber that require mechanical help (fork lift, crane or whatever) to move around then it probably doesn't matter.

    For sheet goods I was thinking in terms of a table saw. Too low and you don't get the right leverage. Too high and getting the sheet up on top of the saw is a lot more difficult. With a router other issues come into play, but one big one is this: is the table recessed? If the table sits in a hole I would think that the table would have to be lower for easy sheet handling.

    In the end I don't think there is such a thing as a normal height for a machine tool. You have to factor in the rest of the shop, the person running the machine and tools at hand for material handling. Frankly you need to have adjustment in the legs for leveling and as such you can add a bit extra for height adjustment. Just make sure the all thread or bolts used for adjustment are substantial as you want to avoid bent legs if the table is bumped or moved forcibly.

  13. #13
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    Re: CNC Height?

    Like Leeway I might be weird, my table is at 42 inches. makes an awesome work table when not being a CNC. Only disadvantage sometimes hard to do clamping in the very middle of the table.

  14. #14
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    Re: CNC Height?

    I voted 36 inches but both of my own routers are 38 inches because of the casters. And I like the height, it works well for me. I'm 6'0".

  15. #15
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    Re: CNC Height?

    Well whatever height you decide on be sure to include whatever feet/levelers you are going to use, I forgot and now my table is a couple of inches higher than planned, no big deal but annoying none the less.
    I'll get it finished sometime after I start it.....

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