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  1. #1
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    Tree vertical mill - question

    I'm looking into getting one locally at a decent price.

    Tree vertical milling machine
    10 x 36 table
    power feed on z-axis
    owner has a bunch of collets
    table & ways are clean
    220/440 3-phase
    1HP motor with step pulleys - 8 speeds


    Is this brand made in the USA? The owner has had it for the last 15 years.


    Thanks for any help!

  2. #2
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    Yes, Tree milling machines were made at Tree Tool And Die Works, in Racine Wisconsin. I have a Model 2UVR-C in my garage that has power feeds on X, Y & Z and variable spindle speeds. It sounds like you also have the Quick Click collet system which is pretty nice. The only disadvantage is the maximum shank size which is 3/4". The only other minus is the fact that Tree may have gone out of business and spare parts might be hard to find. I'm still looking into that, but as far as conventional milling machines go they are far better than than Bridgeports and Laguns.

  3. #3
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    just a lead on the tree firm:

    Tree founder dies

    James A Tree died in Racine, WI on Nov 11 at the age of 79. Mr Tree worked at the company (then called Tree Tool & Die Works) since he was a young man and became president in 1964. As a result of the Tree family work with small general-purpose milling machines, 17 US patents were amassed for improving the function and operation of such equipment.

    The company was later sold to James Ellison, president of Ellison Machinery Co. Until 1995, Mr Tree continued working as an inventor and consultant. Tree Machine Tool Co is a 70-year-old manufacturer and marketer of metalworking machine tools, including CNC milling, drilling, turning, and related equipment.

  4. #4
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    tree is a good machine I disagree with the statement that it better than a bridgeport or lugan I feel they are equal

  5. #5
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    Tree Machine is indeed out of business, but some former employees bought their inventory and are also buying current inventory from some of Tree's suppliers. They are very knowledgable and fair in pricing( so far) ,"Three S @ 414 570 9530 ( Their invoices indicate Wisconsin ) .Tree manufactured some very good , Stout,American Iron.They are credited with one of the 1st 2 axes CNC machine in the late 70's, but fell behind in the 90's due to control problems.Too bad, another good American machine tool company bites the dust.

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the tip on 3S - I just called them for info, and they have a website at http://www.3sincorporated.com. They said that they do spindle rebuilds, have a pile of parts and even have prints for a number of items should they ever run out of stock on something. Prices seem decent as well - Ellison quoted $230 for the spindle nose ring, while 3S wants only $175.

  7. #7
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    I asked Paul G. if we could get a forum dedicated to Tree mills, and he obliged us: http://www.cnczone.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=308

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the Web Site, and THANKS AGAIN TO PAUL for the Forum !

  9. #9
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    Smile

    [IMG]Tree Mill after retro fit[/IMG] [IMG]parts[/IMG] Here are pics of my recent PC operated retrofit . The mill is a 1979 Tree ( was 2 axis)that sat in a Defense Contractors storage room for 16 years ( control went kaput ) I bought as salvage at an auction,used a few years as a manual mill. After retirement I rebuilt the head ,ball nuts and shafts etc, but an accident made it hard to operate from a wheel chair manually, so I retrofitted using MTC servos,servo Amplifiers, encoders and Desk CNC motion Control Card and their software. I did add Bayside
    ( Parker) Planatary Reducers and with the belt drive gives a 20:1 reduction. The 20:1 relates to 80,000 steps per inch for excellent resolution.I handled the Z axis with a double reduction jack shaft and drive the quill through the rack and pinion.The Z is only 3200 steps an inch, but accuracy is ok. I ripped out all old wiring, electronics, relays etc ( That was fun !) and started over.At least I understand the system and could trouble shoot if a problem comes up.
    We built a plexiglass enclosure that opens in front , and if need be can be removed with two allen screws. Does help keep the coolant in and returing to the pump sump.
    I used an AC Tech 2 hp VFD with the remote control...That works good ,in fact have the spindle speed above 4500 now.This means I can dedicate one of the phase converters to the 20 inch Bandsaw. Considering using a 10 hp VFD for my Pratt&Whitney Lathe as the 12 hp idler plus the 10 hp lathe do draw a bunch of amps,and from testing amp draw before and after the VFD, there is a substantial improvement.
    Just started using Vector CadCam and have been able to make some decent parts (pictured).I'm a real computor Klutz so I had to"go back to school"(Microsoft XP for Dummies,CNC for Beginners and Dummies ) and ask a lot of questions...both Fred Smith at IM services, who supports & sell Desk CNC and Vector, and Scott at MTC have been very helpful & prompt with replys. Both have had to talk me through some self induced problems , and with out laughing
    Accuracy after warming up the machine is : X= 0.0003 ,Y=0.0007 and Z=0.0015.
    I had a terrible time understanding "cutter Comp" so scrapped some complicated pieces and had to start over , even with the drawings. I edit the generated G code for tool changes by sending X out past the part stock and coding in a pause ( 60 seconds)
    twice now I left Z down in the part and rumbled out at Max G00..One I had already cut to 3/4 inch...That made some noise as it ripped out 3/4" with a 3/4" cutter at 50
    IPM.. not good.Before hooking up limit switches, I banged my 22 year old Heidiham ( or how ever you spell that German word ) x axes DRO sender in the back of the table. Naturally, they do not supply any parts or replacements for something that age, so had to buy a new DRO. I was able to use the Y Axes sender to locate the knee accuratley,as I motorized the knee.That Tree knee is real heavy,just could not raise or lower out of the wheelchair.The knee is not a part of the CNC Controls, just a convience to flip a switch and raise and lower.
    I did find out you can not manually move X-Y very well ( with power 0ff) as cranking back into the 20:1 reduction is like being stuck in syrup. With the power on and the servos holding I can not move the X-Y at all, so all location is done with the mouse.Ok after you get used to it, but still find my self starting over to the handle to tweak it.
    Cost with the mill (no moving costs included) has been $5500.00, but does not include the Vector CadCam software, and I got everything with that.On- a- count of its a "project", I did not keep track of labor hours spent, and had to hire a next door neighbor to help with some heavy stuff.Wife helped with removing/replacing the leadscrews and thats NOT reccomended for a happy marriage,by the way.
    Now in the planning stages of building a CNC plasma cutter ,will use the same set up and software...keep looking at that 12 by 30 Pratt-Whitney lathe for possible CNC too.
    It has been fun.

  10. #10
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    Well , got the pictures as far as the CNC Zone Photo Gallery, can not seem to get them to the Thread..Said I was a computer Klutz !

  11. #11
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    Adobe Machine Pictures

    Tree Mill conversion pictures by Adobe Machine.

    Also are in the photo gallery, and somewhat sharper.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails TreeX01.jpg   TreeX05.jpg   TreeX09.jpg   TreeX11.jpg  

  12. #12
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    Pendentive , I think you'll be pleased with the purchase of the Tree machine, I'm an HSMr and I have no complaints and the people that I've run into who have them speak highly of them. In the beginning you'll think of the collets as a hassel until you get used to them and then relize there a lor easier and faster than R8s. I find the machine very robust and user friendly! Good luck on your choise!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by cadman View Post
    Yes, Tree milling machines were made at Tree Tool And Die Works, in Racine Wisconsin. I have a Model 2UVR-C in my garage that has power feeds on X, Y & Z and variable spindle speeds. It sounds like you also have the Quick Click collet system which is pretty nice. The only disadvantage is the maximum shank size which is 3/4". The only other minus is the fact that Tree may have gone out of business and spare parts might be hard to find. I'm still looking into that, but as far as conventional milling machines go they are far better than than Bridgeports and Laguns.

    I DO HAVE 2 TREE MACHINE THE 2UVR-C IN MY GARAGE,BUT THE COMPUTER BOARDS ARE NOT WORKING. IF YOU KNOWN OF ANYONE THAT HAS ONE OR KNOW HOW TO REPAIR THEM.PLEASE E-MAIL ME AT WILLIAMSBERNARD@SBCGLOBAL.NET 1-661-272-1288

  14. #14
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    SEEKING COLLETS

    DOES ANYONE KNOW OF ANY SUPPLIERS FOR COLLETS FOR Model 2UVR-C MILLING MACHINE? IF SO, PLEASE GIVE MAIN ADDRESS, PHONE NUMBER, AND WEBSITE ADDRESS, IF AVAILABLE. THANK YOU!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adobe Machine View Post
    ...They are credited with one of the 1st 2 axes CNC machine in the late 70's, but fell behind in the 90's due to control problems...
    Boston Digital was doing 3-axis contouring CNC machines in the early 70's, if not before that (company started in 1965). Of course, they were high-end machines.

  16. #16
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    Yes, I should have said "knee type mills".
    As a note, ACC machinery in Phoenix Az has a "Machine Museum" that has 3 axis CNC machines dating to the late '50s, early '60s,
    huge tape machines that must have a ton of wiring and relay's in them.As I remember, rapids at 20 IPM, cuts at 5-6 IPM, but took a crew of 3 to operate,trouble shoot and an E.E. to keep it running.

    Adobe (older than dirt)

  17. #17
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    Tree information

    I have sarched for information on these mills before I bought one, and it was just not available and since the company is not supporting them, here is what I have to share, if you want other pdf of manuals vhoppes@butler-bremer.com
    Attached Files Attached Files

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