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IndustryArena Forum > Hobby Projects > Steam Engines > 1st Steam/Air Engine
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  1. #1
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    Mar 2005
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    1st Steam/Air Engine

    I have wanted to build a steam engine from scratch for a while. Today I started the "Jingle Bell" engine from http://npmccabe.tripod.com/jinglebellmotor.htm. I like the look of this engine and have almost enough material on hand to finish it.

    I drew up the plans in cad, used Sheetcam, and cut the fly wheel today my HF CNCed mill. I will cut the frame next.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails flywheel small.jpg  

  2. #2
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    Cool! Steam is the reason I became a machinest, but at 58 years young, I have yet to build one. I didn't know of this design and It looks like I could knock it out in a morning. I'll have to see what is in the scrap bin (grin).
    Regards, Ray in FLA
    ​"There is no such thing as a gun free zone."
    Ray Brandes, Ray-Vin.Com, PCB, FL 32408 USA

  3. #3
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    Nov 2004
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    Hi !

    I 'm a newbie and love reading the articles in this great site.

    I would like to thank you all & wish you a " Merry Christmas " & a great " New Year "

  4. #4
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    Anyone out there know of an application where steam could power a generator? Merry Christmas , Michael

  5. #5
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    Feb 2006
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    Oscillating Steam Engine

    I made a double acting oscillating steam engine from the plans by Eric-Jan Stroetinga. I have a close-to-stock engine detailed on my web site at: http://members.shaw.ca/rpape or http://members.shaw.ca/clc_switcher. I can provide the plans in the original metric, or my english measure conversion to any one who wants them. Eric-Jan has given me permission to post them. The engine took me about 15 days to build. I'm not a machinist by trade and don't really know what I'm doing. I'm good at math, though, so the valves are right. I made DXF 3d drawing of the most difficult to maunfacture part on the web page with a Java DXF viewer to view it.

  6. #6
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    The oscillating engine at the top looks like a very simple design, excellent for the beginner. I find half the fun is in designing one yourself, it takes a bit longer but it's nice to see a design of your own working.

    A steam engine could power a generator, you'd have to design the engine of a suitable size to provide the power you want from the generator obviously. It would just be a novelty really though, it's not going to be a very efficient way of generating electricity!

  7. #7
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    I agree about steam not being the most efficient way of generating power but theres one thing about steam power that is attractive. Theres an abundance of fuel in wood or coal. In a remote location where fuel would be a problem Id think that steam would be a great source of both electricity, heating and you could even route the steam to heat a still to make alcohol fuel for other engines. Should things in this world get really bad it will be the technology of the 1800s that will be the easiest and most reliable to start back up with. As you can guess Im interrested in steam mostly from a survivalists point of view. Im not saying the sky is falling but a person would have to be blind not to see the steady progression of events. I hope these comments dont turn people off. They werent meant to be.
    Michael

  8. #8
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    Sep 2006
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    Michael,
    Also look into the Stirling Engines.. much higher in efficiency.
    Some motors run on the heat of your hand or small candle(s)/alcohol lamps.
    I'm looking at one that's small enough to hold in your hands and gives out 25/35 HP.
    so you're looking at a 20/30 KW Generator.
    Also look into Solid State Generators -- they require less HP to turn.
    You can also use car Alt. and convert them as well.

  9. #9
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    I agree with all the points made there. Suppose you'd need to make some sort of circuit to drive the feed pump to keep the water level in the boiler. Otherwise it would require constant attention.

    Anyway, this topic is in danger of going off topic, maybe these issues should be brought up in a separate thread. I believe some of them have been discussed in a stirling post.

  10. #10
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    Jul 2004
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    Finished!

    The reason I became a machinist was to build little steam engines. Now, at 58, I have finally finished one! Here is a movie of it running on about 10psi.
    Click Here
    I'll take it apart tomorrow and polish the parts.
    Watch out for errors and ommisions in those Jingle drawings! Seems .480 should be .280...
    Regards, Ray in FLA
    ​"There is no such thing as a gun free zone."
    Ray Brandes, Ray-Vin.Com, PCB, FL 32408 USA

  11. #11
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    Well done, I love that feeling when you've made something yourself and it works!

    I will have to get back in the garage myself.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by RBrandes View Post
    The reason I became a machinist was to build little steam engines. Now, at 58, I have finally finished one! Here is a movie of it running on about 10psi.
    Click Here
    I'll take it apart tomorrow and polish the parts.
    Watch out for errors and ommisions in those Jingle drawings! Seems .480 should be .280...
    Regards, Ray in FLA
    How does that work?

    Where is the steam/water going in/out?

    Sorry for the lack of knowledge. It looks great by the way.

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