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IndustryArena Forum > CAM Software > CamBam > Stuff made with CamBam
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  1. #21
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    Nice looking wood machine. I bet its more rigid than some the cheap chinese aluminum machines out there. Why did you decided to go with a moving table instead of a moving gantry? Same thing? Sacrifice some working envelope to make the machine stiffer?
    Bob La Londe
    http://www.YumaBassMan.com

  2. #22
    Hi,

    Thanks, it is was designed mainly for stiffness. I used there Tr 14x4 (it is ACME thread 14 mm diameter and 4 mm pitch) and only 0.8 Nm motors. It is not very fast. So I decide to put relative small feed (1m /min) and try to achieve biggest stiffness that can be achieve in that kind of construction. Result is quite good for me

    Br,
    Kazik
    http://www.fightech.blogspot.com

  3. #23
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    MaxNC Bearign Mod

    I had retired it but it bugs me sitting there on the shelf unused. I decided to add captive bearings to the X & Y lead screws. I don't have a clue how to get everything lined to cut a fixed one piece bearing carrier so I went with a two piece adjustable design. One end of the screw will continue to be supported by the stepper motor, but the other will be supported by a captive double bearing. With a spacer between the bearings it should eliminate almost all backlash. (I already retrofit acetal antibacklash nuts a while back).

    There were multiple problems. First I had to figure out how to fix the bearings to the tiny little 1/4" acme lead screws. I made a "mandrel" type piece for each lead screw. They were turned to 1/2" (the size of the bearing bore) threaded on one end for a nut, and drilled out threw the center and tapped to 1/4 16 Acme. Then I drilled and tapped the collar for two 6-32 set screws. In theory I can adjust the working length of the lead screw to optimum by threading these on or off the lead, then when I have it right just tighten the set screws.

    Then I had to make a bearing carrier. I went with a two piece one. The back piece can be adjust left to right, and the front piece which holds the bearings can be adjusted up and down.

    Ultimately I shoould be able to crank the table up close to the fixed bearing and snug up all the screws in order to position the bearing very close to center of the lead screw axis. Maybe I'll assemble it all tomorrow, but I still have to cut one more front piece. Of course X & Y are both different so every piece is unique. To make it more interesting the front part of the bearing carrier has to cover the screws for the back piece. Hopefully I can get close and then just slide the table forward to get to the back screws.

    Three of the four bearing carrier parts were made in CamBam. The 4th part will also be when I get to it. Fortunately all I should have to do to design the last piece is make the base level wider and move the mounting screw slots out to match the threaded holes in its matching base.

    The mandrel/shaft adaptor was done by hand and on my manual lathe.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 2012-12-14_16-44-58_363.jpg   2012-12-14_17-00-44_640.jpg   2012-12-14_17-01-57_383.jpg   2012-12-14_17-02-11_541.jpg  
    Bob La Londe
    http://www.YumaBassMan.com

  4. #24
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    Here are some more work done in CamBam.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Letter R.jpg   IMG_1881.jpg   IMG_1821.jpg  
    Forget about global warming...Visualize using your turn signal!

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob La Londe View Post
    I had retired it but it bugs me sitting there on the shelf unused. I decided to add captive bearings to the X & Y lead screws. I don't have a clue how to get everything lined to cut a fixed one piece bearing carrier so I went with a two piece adjustable design. One end of the screw will continue to be supported by the stepper motor, but the other will be supported by a captive double bearing. With a spacer between the bearings it should eliminate almost all backlash. (I already retrofit acetal antibacklash nuts a while back).

    There were multiple problems. First I had to figure out how to fix the bearings to the tiny little 1/4" acme lead screws. I made a "mandrel" type piece for each lead screw. They were turned to 1/2" (the size of the bearing bore) threaded on one end for a nut, and drilled out threw the center and tapped to 1/4 16 Acme. Then I drilled and tapped the collar for two 6-32 set screws. In theory I can adjust the working length of the lead screw to optimum by threading these on or off the lead, then when I have it right just tighten the set screws.

    Then I had to make a bearing carrier. I went with a two piece one. The back piece can be adjust left to right, and the front piece which holds the bearings can be adjusted up and down.

    Ultimately I shoould be able to crank the table up close to the fixed bearing and snug up all the screws in order to position the bearing very close to center of the lead screw axis. Maybe I'll assemble it all tomorrow, but I still have to cut one more front piece. Of course X & Y are both different so every piece is unique. To make it more interesting the front part of the bearing carrier has to cover the screws for the back piece. Hopefully I can get close and then just slide the table forward to get to the back screws.

    Three of the four bearing carrier parts were made in CamBam. The 4th part will also be when I get to it. Fortunately all I should have to do to design the last piece is make the base level wider and move the mounting screw slots out to match the threaded holes in its matching base.

    The mandrel/shaft adaptor was done by hand and on my manual lathe.

    Finished... Sort of...

    I see two things I would do differently if I did this again, which I might on the RF30 if I ever decided to convert it to CNC.

    1. Make the screw slots longer for a greater range of adjustment. When I cranked it up close I was able to get it to relax within my travel, but all four pieces were near the limit of the travel I planned to allow when I tightened them down. The idea was to allow me to just crank the table over next to the fixed bearing, and tighten the bearing backer plate and then the bearing carrier plate down in that position to have the best alignment. It worked, but just barely.

    2. Make the bearing arbors much longer. I think they need to be a good inch longer, and have a square machined on the end to allow me to put a wrench on them when I tighten up the lock nut. Instead I had to put a pair of pliers on the motor coupler to tighten up the lock nut. There is an awful lot of flex and twist in a 1/4" ACME lead screw that long. It made me very nervous tightening it down.

    Fixes:

    1: Nothing. It was close to limits, but within the adjustment I designed in... just barely. I guess that means it was a success.

    2: I will probably make new bearing arbors when I get the machine up and running again and I can measure the backlash in the bearings so I know how thick to make the spacers that go between them. I'll have to partially dissassemble things to put the spacers in anyway. I am using the motors and controller I had on this machine before on my table top router. I threw away the crap controller that came with the router. I am playing with using the original motors off the router with a TB6560 controller for this machine, but if I am not happy with it I am prepared to pick up another GeckoDrive G540 controller.

    Yes I did use different size screws on X & Y as bearing clamps. I planned 10-32 socket heads, and then chickened out for thickness of metal and went with 6-32 and a washer. When I had to punch a broken tap out of the second one it allowed me to drill out and tap to 10-32 as was originally planned.

    Four of the six parts made to fix the bearings to the leads screws and the table/saddle were designed and cut with CamBam. The bearing arbors were machined manually on one of my mini lathes.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails BETA Bearing Carriers.JPG  
    Bob La Londe
    http://www.YumaBassMan.com

  6. #26
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    The Tin Can - I Might Actually Leak Check It Soon - Video

    I don't know for sure if I have all the leaks welded up yet, but I haven't been able to take it out and leak check it until now. I finally have the winch tower redone specifically for a square front jon boat, and have a new winch on it. Now for a safety cable and some straps.

    Winch Tower Fabrication for Square Front Jon Boat - YouTube
    Bob La Londe
    http://www.YumaBassMan.com

  7. #27
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    I made these. The outer shape was pre-cut by a vendor before we went cnc. I taught myself how to do CAD drawings, run CamBam, tweak the post processor and how to run my new to me machine in less than 6weeks. Was quite the mental work out. But I feel I am doing well. Just need to learn how to take 3d drawings and run them through cam bam to get a good program for the machine. Right now I am stuck running stuff all from DXF files and then doing a lot of thinking to figure out depths and such. Not bad but its time consuming to refine and make programs so that they are efficient on machine time. Got a ways to go. But so far, for the price I am happy with it. There are a few tweaky things with it but I can live with it.

    Attachment 197524

  8. #28
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    I made some guitar templates. I know what you're thinking... "Why not just machine the guitar?". I will, but I need to make some money off the machine right now!

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	CNC Rebuild 024.JPG 
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  9. #29
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    Gift Box - Or a Slug for Shoulder a Carried Rail Gun. LOL!

    Gift Box - Or a Slug for Shoulder a Carried Rail Gun. LOL!

    Different Approaches

    Wow! Good practice in deep pocketing techniques. Before I do another anything like this I am going to get some more extended length endmills in larger sizes.

    I could have done it on the lathe (and I cleaned it up on the lathe when I was done), but I wanted to do it on the mill. The 5HP mill definitely pushes the big drills better than the lathe would have.
    Bob La Londe
    http://www.YumaBassMan.com

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by kregan View Post
    All the CNC parts on my youtube channel and web site below.

    I just posted this work holding vice jig tonight.

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IQOq7fBbzXc]CNC Work Holding Solution - YouTube[/ame]

    Nice man I am using CamBam now too.. so far so good! Hope you are well. Peace

    Pete

  11. #31
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    Re: Stuff made with CamBam

    Nice work there, and your choices of wood work very nicely. I'm just starting to work with wood using CB, and I have a few questions. But, for now, when you use CB for doing the feeds and speeds, do you use what CB chooses, or do you have that worked out on your own? I'm using the Height Mapping feature of CB, and I wonder if the X-Y-Z speeds are much different on wood versus aluminum. If you have any suggestions on tooling versus speeds, etc, it would be very helpful. Even a suggested web site with this info would be nice. Thanks much for your time. John

  12. #32
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    Re: Stuff made with CamBam

    Bob La Londe
    http://www.YumaBassMan.com

  13. #33
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    Re: Stuff made with CamBam

    Quote Originally Posted by Bertram View Post
    I think it is time we had a thread for displaying Stuff made with CamBam. There are a lot of options out there for g-code generation, but in terms of bang for buck (for me at least) CamBam is the bee's knees.

    I'll kick off with a small project that used pocketing and profiling, generated from a dxf file. The full story can be had here: http://www.cnczone.com/forums/494310-post139.html .

    The zipfile contains the CamBam files and the g-code files generated from the cb files. X0 and Y0 are bottom left, Z0 is top of the material.

    The side pieces are cut from 1/4" material, the tops and bottoms are cut from 1/8" material. Everything is cut with a 1/8" end mill.
    Just wondered what you had made your cable chain from? I tried making it from hard board... Did not go so well...

  14. #34
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    Re: Stuff made with CamBam

    Quote Originally Posted by rusty13jr View Post
    Just wondered what you had made your cable chain from? I tried making it from hard board... Did not go so well...
    Try HDPE.
    Bob La Londe
    http://www.YumaBassMan.com

  15. #35
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    Re: Stuff made with CamBam

    Thanks, Bob. I will give that a shot. I hope the fish are biting (and staying hooked!)

  16. #36
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    Re: Stuff made with CamBam

    Bob
    Fishing you got my attention. Fishing is my drug of choice no matter if it's salt or fresh.

  17. #37
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    Re: Stuff made with CamBam

    Chocolate bars made with CamBam.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20160317_203027_resized.jpg  
    Bob La Londe
    http://www.YumaBassMan.com

  18. #38
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    Re: Stuff made with CamBam

    Cutting the LBS Shad on the Syil X4 Speedmaster - YouTube

    The LBS Shad was originally cut on the little MaxNC5 shown above in this thread. The X4 Speedmaster does it in less than half the time.
    Bob La Londe
    http://www.YumaBassMan.com

  19. #39
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    Re: Stuff made with CamBam

    Designed in ViaCad all CAM done in CamBam:



    Bob La Londe
    http://www.YumaBassMan.com

  20. #40
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    Re: Stuff made with CamBam

    Ah, I see my LBS Shad Cutting Video Link got messed up. Here it is again.
    Bob La Londe
    http://www.YumaBassMan.com

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