548,590 active members*
2,905 visitors online*
Register for free
Login
IndustryArena Forum > WoodWorking Machines > Commercial CNC Wood Routers > Total newbie considering 1325 router - restoring a chateau
Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
    Posts
    2

    Total newbie considering 1325 router - restoring a chateau

    Hello all,

    I’ve been browsing this forum for a while and have been extremely impressed by the quality of the posts, knowledge and friendliness.

    Cards on the table: I’m a total novice, no experience of cnc machines, woodworking, stone or metalwork so I’m fully in at the deep end, but that’s how I like it.

    I’m in the process of restoring a chateau in France which has had its interior totally stripped out, so I need to fabricate wooden panelling, ceiling roses, cornices, doors, window furniture, window rails, fireplaces, faux stone columns, etc etc.

    I’m a private individual with some design skill and software knowledge (programmer by trade) and from what I’ve been reading a CNC machine would really be a major asset and general money saver in the long run.

    I think I need a 1325 size because the doors are around that size and it’s the probably the biggest I can actually get through the doors of the chateau.

    Not sure if I need a true 4 axis machine or just a 3 axis with rotary device. Of course I’ve been looking at the Chinese machines due to the insane pricing of European models.

    I’d appreciate any advice you can give me and thanks for reading!

    Cheers Paul

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    5421

    Re: Total newbie considering 1325 router - restoring a chateau

    Be aware that there are plenty of pitfalls involved in ordering a machine from China. You might want to read about some other people's experiences with the process before sending large amounts of money off to the other side of the world. This might be a good place to start: https://www.cnczone.com/forums/chinese-machines/

    Some people have reported good results, but there are also plenty of horror stories about machines arriving with broken or bad parts, incompatible electrics, shipping delays and unexpected charges, obsolete or pirated software, and total lack of support once the money's been paid. With the current pandemic affecting supply chains as it has, be prepared for even long wait times and lots more excuses for delays and problems.

    Part of why you're noticing a difference between prices from vendors in your country and those overseas is because domestic companies usually budget for supporting their customers when their machines have issues. If, as you say, you're a novice at this, this promise of support is especially valuable to you. If your imported machine doesn't work, you're generally stuck either repairing it yourself or finding someone who works on Chinese machines, which can be difficult.

    It sounds like you're planning on a lot of flat work, so a dedicated 4-axis machine probably wouldn't be the right choice; you'll want a 4th axis assembly you can mount on your machine or take off as needed.
    Andrew Werby
    Website

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
    Posts
    2

    Re: Total newbie considering 1325 router - restoring a chateau

    Hi Andrew

    Thanks for the advice, I’m not totally a newb with importing from China having imported a mini excavator last year. But I have been doing my research on this forum which has been invaluable.

    Although you are right I am doing a lot of flat work what I wanted to avoid was the plasticity look you get cutting work with no overhangs. I’ve attached a picture of what I mean, in the picture the flowers have no undercut. In traditional hand carved pieces those would have been present making the work look much nicer. At least with a 4 axis it would have been possible to add undercut to the x axis (using the a axis spindle).

    I’m assuming on a 3 axis machine you’d need to hand finish to get the same effect?

    edit: I've added an example in the 2nd picture of someone hand carving an undercut into a similar flower design.

    Cheers Paul
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 183E55FD-25B5-4803-8C92-C58154458374.jpg   yasmin_2_700.jpg  
    Last edited by Monsterer; 11-05-2021 at 10:55 AM. Reason: added example of undercut

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    5421

    Re: Total newbie considering 1325 router - restoring a chateau

    I'm not seeing your pictures, but sure - you don't get undercuts with a 3-axis machine. On the other hand, trying to add them by suspending a large flat piece between a rotary table and a tailstock makes the carving process a lot less stable. Especially out toward the edges, there will be a lot of vibration that will express itself as choppy cutting. If this is what you really want to do, look into a tilting spindle rather than a rotary table. But save some money for software, because 5-axis CAM isn't cheap. You might find that adding a few undercuts by hand isn't that big a deal, comparatively.

    If you're experienced at importing things from China, then at least you know what you're getting into; I won't worry about you as much.
    Andrew Werby
    Website

  5. #5
    Registered
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1031

    Re: Total newbie considering 1325 router - restoring a chateau

    I understand the desire to have a machine that will help you with such a massive project.I would also caution that a headlong plunge into acquiring a machine for a technology you have no experience with could be expensive and frustrating.

    Is there any element of time pressure to the restoration?It isn't the work of a few months to become competent with CAD,CAM and then the machining of useable parts and it gets a bit more challenging when you add in the step to 5 axis work.You won't get anywhere until you can produce a decent CAD file (disregard the fossils who insist that with a print to hand they can type in Gcode thats as least as good as any CAM program) and something like rectangular panels with all four sides connected is a simple place to start.Then search for a free or demo version of some CAD software to play with for a while until you can output 2D shapes.Then its time to look for some CAM software to have a play with creating toolpaths.You can find yourself getting quite absorbed in defining tools,learning about feed rates,depth of cut and which side of the line to cut.Once you think you are getting to the point of producing useable toolpaths you can run them in simulation software to see it it looks right but the next challenge is finding a post processor that will create the code for your chosen machine.Which is why I recommend beginning with the software as you will need to find a machine that can work with the code you produce without having to commission a custom post processor.It will also be less frustrating if you have an amount of experience with creating toolpaths before you have a shiny machine sitting there with nothing to create because you haven't learned how do do that part.

    It may be that you ought to consider a hybrid approach to producing something like ceiling roses and design them yourself for machining by somebody else or by carving the features that are undercut with a 3D machine so that a carver can embellish the tricky parts because a good size 5 axis machine might cost as much as your chateau by the time you have got the software too.For things like faux stone columns you could machine the outer surfaces and then cut any joint faces on a tilt arbor saw to construct a segmented column as a decent saw will work out a lot less expensive that a 5 axis machine and I certainly wouldn't advise a 3 metre long workpiece on a fourth axis plus tailstock.

    Chinese machines vary from the very sketchy to the just barely adequate to the very good-as do the prices.They've also lost a bit of their price advantage with the leap in shipping costs in the last year or so.Have you contemplated looking for a used machine somewhere in Europe that could do the majority of your work?It might be a faster way to get some parts in your workshop and while we are on the topic of workshops,how robust is your power supply?You will need ample power for the machine and an extraction system and if you propose to cut any quantity of panels,you might need to run a powerful vacuum system as well.I doubt that a single phase supply will be up to the job but a chateau may have a substantial power line coming in.The right decisions are important as mistakes will cost both time and money while the optimal choice will save both.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •