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  1. #217
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    Dec 2005
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    3319
    The problem with Vaseline is that is a water soluble lubricant. Hence, its solubility with other pertroleum lubes is/can be suspect. In an imperfect world, the stuff could (not will gum up when it tries to mix with other lubes later on). Moreover, it is NOT noted for having good film strength which is/can be critical for some applications. Again, Vaseline is great for baby bottoms and thermometers - it ain't necessarilly a good rolling or sliding MACHINE element grease.

    The other lubes mentioned (Alvania, Beacon and 105) will do the same thing - assembly lube and/or hold balls in place. These will also tend to intermix with other lubes that may be applied later on - especially Alvania as it is an approved ball screw lube.

    Over the years, Vaseline HAS been use for a lot of things it probably shouldn't be - I even know of a case where some well intended soul used it for cam assembly -BUZZZ, WRONG, NO, NEGATIVE, DON"T GO THERE. Yes it worked for years but when he did a high buck "race cam" and it promptly ate itself, he found the one situation where it shouldn't and didn't work.

    One tries to quash the use of incorrect urban legends when one can.....

  2. #218
    Gold Member
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    Nov 2005
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    440
    T

  3. #219
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    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    440
    Thanks for the concern NC..Yes I feel much better, although I can feel and see some of the hardware in the Thoracic region, there is little discomfort. I am actually walking 1/4 to 1/2 mile every day, and back to almost regular workouts..will be back in the shop soon.
    As to the vasoline: I used it to hold the balls in the split return tube, since all the ball nuts have been plumbed to an oil pump, the vasoline is washed out with the way oil.

    As to the ball nuts: I do not know about Mc Master-Carrs product, I used Rockwell BMF series fixed angular bearing mounts and the double ball nuts come in kit form. the lead ball nut is attached to flange by threading and a set acrew, the second or tensioner ball nut has a stack of tension washers and the tension nut to press the ball nuts apart. Go to rockfordballscrew.com, they have a lot of info that may help you engineer a system.
    I used the lathe the other day to make a shaft for a compressor that had broken (local Auto repair) which was really very complicated, had some real odd ball threads (.677 X 16 th-inch) and 4 different diameters..I drew it up in Vector , transferred to Desk CNC and watched it whittle away on the lathe, and except for one manual tool change, it was like watching paint dry..Part came out to .0003 in all dimeters, and .0008 on all lengths ( Z axis) the threads were perfect, both the major and minor diameters and pitch were right on.Machine time was less than 30 minutes ( I will not tell anyone how long the rest took me, seemed like days, but thats what the pain killers do).

    THANKS AGAIN!

    Adobe Machine (old as dirt)

  4. #220
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    163
    Are you using Mach3 ?

  5. #221
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    Mar 2006
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    2712
    Adobe, Welcome back!!!!
    DZASTR

  6. #222
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    440
    TT 350: No, I'm using Desk CNC to run both the Mill and Lathe, and Vector 11 as the CAD/CAM program ( Mill is a retrofitted Tree 10 X 50", that now has 4 axis capabilites),I also use a program called CLGG or "Lathe Quick" written by Ron Hill, a member of this forum, that can Thread ANY SAE or Metric thread, turn diameters, drill or groove . The program is a "fill in " or conversational type, using regular G and M code commands, the one big requirement is that the spindle RPM can be tracked,and the feed of the Z axis be controlled by the program.I got all of the programs from imserv@imsrv.com. Their after sale service and help is just been very, very good.

    DZASTR..! Good to hear from you too ! I'm making good progress this time. Surgeons used a very new method and hardware system that gives some flexability as opposed to complete rigid stabilization ( L1 to S1)..actually feel great, finally after 5 years...

    Adobe (older than dirt, but younger than DZASTR!)

  7. #223
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    Mar 2006
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    2712
    Adobe, NC Cams spilled his age in another posting. He was in high school in the late 60's. Young whipper-snapper. I know this should be in a PM, but this is easier. Now that you're up and around, do you have any inclination to pilot drag boats? My doctor called me a dumb SOB when I told him I would do just like a thrown horseman and climb back on my snowmobiles. Back to your thread now.
    DZASTR

  8. #224
    Gold Member
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    Nov 2005
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    440

    Smile catch up and a new project

    (nuts)NEW BUILD AND SOME PICS.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails jse_CNC_PLASMA_CUTTER,ASSEMBLY_004.jpg  
    Attached Files Attached Files

  9. #225
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    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    440
    The base Plasma table is constructed of 2X2 heavy wall tubing (that is what hitches are made of). Shown welded with my MIG welder,and painted)

    1st rule on this build is that it must be stout,use only materials that I own,(cheap) accuracy to .001 or better, be movable in the shop for storage ,cheap and fast.

    A study of the Model Plasma Cutter I own (Miller 2050) shows I can cut up to 7/8 steel ( never tried that ) at approx 10 IMP, down to 1/8 at 180 IPM,(never could do that by hand),and without a quide, I can not cut a good streight line, with a guide, you can see my heart beat ,it is so sensitive. So CNC control is a must if I'm to use the Plasma cutter to its best use.

    Pic 1 & 2 show the table welded and complete.

    Pic 3 shows a temp mount of the X axis ,disassembled and cleaned, shown is the "belt gripper" and how stout that is, and that is 3 of eight interior ball rollers,really heavy duty . Once assembled with the eight side rollers there is NO side movement or slop.

    I was really suprised how stout this assembly is..the inner tract is hardned steel, the bearing/ball rollers can be individually adjusted
    ( they are piloted with an eccentric stub shaft), and ditto the side rollers.This "robot" was well engineered and quality assembled.

    pic 3 shows the inside track. The belt drive is split, ten te two are brought together with an adjustable cover, really neat.

    pic 4 shows the side rollers for the X axis..

    pic 5 more side rollers

    pic 6 Y axis installed to X axis

    pic 7 shows the Z axis (air operated + or -) mounted to the Y axis and X Axis.

    pic 8 X and Y axis mount

    next is the Z axis ( back)

    next is the Y axis lazy end track,cut from a piece of 1" 6061.

    Next my Miller Spectrum 2050

    different view of X-Y axis

    Machined plate or drive mock up

    large top plate with machined pocket for the servo

    another view

    mock up x axis ( in the final , I used the same stack ,but moved the X axis To the outide of the table)

    different view

    X drive axis ( and the Y axis is identical except smaller) squeeze coller)

    machined spacer and lower plate

    spacer installed

    lower plate and bearing installed
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails jse_CNC_PLASMA_CUTTER_BUILD_002.jpg   jse_CNC_PLASMA_CUTTER_BUILD_004.jpg   jse_CNC_PLASMA_CUTTER_BUILD_007.jpg   jse_CNC_PLASMA_CUTTER_BUILD_009.jpg   jse_CNC_PLASMA_CUTTER_BUILD_010.jpg  

    jse_CNC_PLASMA_CUTTER_BUILD_011.jpg   jse_CNC_PLASMA_CUTTER_BUILD_012.jpg   jse_CNC_PLASMA_CUTTER_BUILD_014.jpg   jse_CNC_PLASMA_CUTTER_BUILD_016.jpg   jse_CNC_PLASMA_CUTTER_BUILD_017.jpg  

    jse_CNC_PLASMA_CUTTER_BUILD_018.jpg   jse_CNC_Plasma_Cutter_progress_018.jpg   jse_CNC_Plasma_Cutter_progress_019.jpg   jse_CNC_PLASMA_CUTTER_BUILD_019.jpg   jse_CNC_Plasma_Cutter_progress_017.jpg  

    jse_CNC_Plasma_Cutter_progress_021.jpg   jse_CNC_Plasma_Cutter_progress_022.jpg   jse_CNC_Plasma_Cutter_progress_024.jpg   jse_CNC_Plasma_Cutter_progress_027.jpg   jse_CNC_Plasma_Cutter_progress_028.jpg  

    jse_CNC_Plasma_Cutter_progress_029.jpg  

  10. #226
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    Jan 2005
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    72
    Adobe,

    Great to have you back.

    I am reading with much interest your project descriptions.

    Thanks

    Paraprop

  11. #227
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    May 2004
    Posts
    100

    Nice to see you back!

    Adobe,

    glad to see you back!

    What soft are you going to use?

    I'm interested in your z axis, can't see much in the picture. One day, maybe once I've finished my lathe and CNCd my milling machine, I'll make a CNC plasma cutter

    Regards, Matthew

  12. #228
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    440
    Matt: I'm using Desk CNC.I just have had real good results with Desk CNC for the Lathe and Mill I retrofitted.Using Vector 11 CAD / CAM has helped a bunch to...If I had to hand code some of these prototype parts would take weeks instead of hours. I will note that there are a lot fewer mistakes when I CAD the part 1st.There have been some "unusual" events when I hand coded complicated parts.

    The Z axis is going to be air operated. The Miller 2050 Plasma Cutter is a "drag type"ie, the torch is actually on the piece to be cut.Between what you can see in the Z axis(more pictures comming tomorrow)will be a block and a plate with ball bearing set screws in it.That locates the torch on the piece to be cut. I'm using an "M" code to raise and lower the Z axis.That triggers a 120 volt air valve to raise and lower.

    The pictures here show how the slots were cut on my band saw ( it has an automatic table feed)I guaged the cuts with a piece of 1/8 steel, and a block squared at 3 inches. Pre setting the travel on the table gave me the same depth on all pieces. This was some real crummy looking 1 inch T6 that I cut on both sides to arrive at 3/4inch.

    As you can see I mocked up the pieces prior to drill/counter sinking and machining the edges. I did offset the center row of slots so that the slats would fit tight and not move around while loading a heavy sheet.I'm sure I saw that on one of weld tutors assemblies.

    I should have more together today, as I drilled /counter sank the Y axis track and cut all of the slats.

    The pictures a kind of random, but yousee the progress .

    Adobe (old as dirt)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails jse_CNC_PLASMA_CUTTER,ASSEMBLY_004.jpg   jse_CNC_PLASMA_CUTTER,ASSEMBLY_005.jpg   jse_CNC_PLASMA_CUTTER,ASSEMBLY_006.jpg   jse_CNC_PLASMA_CUTTER,ASSEMBLY_007.jpg   jse_CNC_PLASMA_CUTTER,ASSEMBLY_010.jpg  


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