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  1. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ger21 View Post
    One problem might be that a "trough" would be created that might fill with dust and chips. I'll think about this for a bit.
    Adding brushes to either end to sweep the chips out may work; you could have small openings at intervals for the chips to fall through.

    John

  2. #14
    LetterCAM.com
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    Since my next machine is not going to be a large one, I'm not worried about unsupported rails. So I'm going to add a support plate on the outside for the bolts to extend to. And then mount each side of the gantry on that plate and go up with it. I may add another set of bearings in the middle to help support the weight. I'll work on it in the morning.

    Warren
    LetterCAM CNC Software
    http://www.LetterCAM.com

  3. #15
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    GER21,

    Hope the development is going well. I might wan't to sign up for one. It did cross my mind you needed the levitating table Then again when I first started looking at cnc tables I couldn't figure out what was doing what

    Quick question, any tips on where to find 3d bolts and such that could be used in rhino.

    Thanks.

    jsage

  4. #16
    Community Moderator ger21's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsage View Post
    Quick question, any tips on where to find 3d bolts and such that could be used in rhino.

    Thanks.

    jsage
    I downloaded 2D drawings from McMaster-Carr, and modelled them in AutoCAD, but with no threads. They also have 3D models for download. Just navigate their website to the size you want and the download link is at the top of the page.
    Gerry

    UCCNC 2017 Screenset
    http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/2017.html

    Mach3 2010 Screenset
    http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/2010.html

    JointCAM - CNC Dovetails & Box Joints
    http://www.g-forcecnc.com/jointcam.html

    (Note: The opinions expressed in this post are my own and are not necessarily those of CNCzone and its management)

  5. #17
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    Much thanks.

  6. #18
    Community Moderator ger21's Avatar
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    Quick sketch. Not sure if I like it. Far less elegant, but it gets rid of the floating table. Seems to me the more parts that you add, the less rigidity you'll have.

    The router I'm building now has a 60" floating table, and it's pretty solid, so that doesn't really bother me too much. I think the original plan would be fine for a 36"-42" X travel, and a lot easier to fab.

    Also, While a wood planar wood give me parallel sides, I think I'd need to CNC the top and bottom edge to get them as parallel as I'd like, without any deviation anywhere. Not a big deal for me, I could do it at work.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Skate_Bearing.gif  
    Gerry

    UCCNC 2017 Screenset
    http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/2017.html

    Mach3 2010 Screenset
    http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/2010.html

    JointCAM - CNC Dovetails & Box Joints
    http://www.g-forcecnc.com/jointcam.html

    (Note: The opinions expressed in this post are my own and are not necessarily those of CNCzone and its management)

  7. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ger21 View Post
    Quick sketch. Not sure if I like it. Far less elegant, but it gets rid of the floating table. Seems to me the more parts that you add, the less rigidity you'll have.
    I still think if you turned it 90 degrees it would be the way to go. You loose the trough and I can’t see how it would be less ridged than how you have it now. If you could add G shaped plates to either end it would be extremely ridged and you could fix brushes to them to clear chips and dust. Now I really like the design!!

    John

    EDIT: In fact it would only need an L shaped plate which could be tack welded to the angle iron.

  8. #20
    Community Moderator ger21's Avatar
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    You mean 90° counter clockwise? Then I'd have to mount it to the table top (or flush to it) instead of the edge. No welding, no steel, aluminum only. No room for more tools.
    Gerry

    UCCNC 2017 Screenset
    http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/2017.html

    Mach3 2010 Screenset
    http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/2010.html

    JointCAM - CNC Dovetails & Box Joints
    http://www.g-forcecnc.com/jointcam.html

    (Note: The opinions expressed in this post are my own and are not necessarily those of CNCzone and its management)

  9. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by ger21 View Post
    You mean 90° counter clockwise? Then I'd have to mount it to the table top (or flush to it) instead of the edge. No welding, no steel, aluminum only. No room for more tools.

    Yes counter clock wise.

    If you were to use steel and have some one track weld L plates for you then you could increase the gap between the vertical bearings. This would then allow you to increase the height of the rail so it would have a larger contact area with the side of the table.

    Also which is probably very obvious to you; you could use the same system for your Y axis fixing rails to a torsion box beam.

    Imho you would end up with a very ridged system.

    John

  10. #22
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    Ger21,

    I was playing around with the idea yesterday. The dimensions on this drawing is off not optimal but presents two options. The first top and bottom inset make it not too different from a standard rail.

    The t slot was another option with a double bearing. Perhaps spring dampened or tensioned.

    I was originally thinking your rail was inside not outside. Perhaps inside would be easier.


    I name it the double option sideways pi

    I added a better visualization still missing some things.

    regards
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails rail profile.jpg   slide profile 2.jpg  

  11. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsage View Post
    Ger21,

    I was playing around with the idea yesterday. The dimensions on this drawing is off not optimal but presents two options. The first top and bottom inset make it not too different from a standard rail.

    The t slot was another option with a double bearing. Perhaps spring dampened or tensioned.

    I was originally thinking your rail was inside not outside. Perhaps inside would be easier.


    I name it the double option sideways pi

    I added a better visualization still missing some things.

    regards

    Interesting option but imho I still think Ger21’s G arrangement is the way to go with my suggestions added in.

    John

  12. #24
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    John,

    Yep, The 90 degree flip makes it conventional. Very hard to recreate the wheel.

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