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IndustryArena Forum > MetalWorking Machines > Benchtop Machines > Coolant, Flood, Mist, WD-40, etc
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpeedsCustom View Post
    I built my own Coolant system, I'll post a video in a bit. Need to make an Enclosure, but you'll see.


    -Speed
    would like to see that
    The opinions expressed in this post are my own. -Les opinions exprimé dans ce messages sont les mienne

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by blades View Post
    WD-40 as a cutting fluid? Sometimes good lubricating oils have an opposite effect when used as a cutting fluid, causing the cutter to rub the surface instead of cutting into it (especially if the end mill is a bit on the dull side, or the material is tough). A good penetrating oil would probably work better. Not sure if WD-40 falls under the lubricant or penetrant category, but it seems to me it would be a lubricant. Anyone else have any feedback on using WD-40? Anyone use something similar?
    That is what I ended up using temporarily. I broke (2) 1/8" carbide bits within minutes of each other by running them dry. I picked up a store brand of WD-40 and drenched the cutting area each pass. I went through two chunks of 5/8" 6061 aluminum without any problems after that. The parts were about 1" x 1-1/2" x 5/8" thick. The stuff stunk though...at least according to my wife when I came from the shop.

    I am going the enclosure and flood coolant setup now. I am basing mine off of Hoss's design.

    Mike

  3. #23
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    Fog Buster

    This thing is so cool. I got the shop air run, pluged her in and mixed up some Kool Mist #77, light blue color. Turn on the mill and started going though the motions. Took a second to figure out the flow rate of the coolant, Next time I just spray in on a flat piece, adjust and than cut.

    It's great being able to see the part being cut, the chips are out of the way and there is no MESS.

    Love it.

    Smitty

  4. #24
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    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EXbIROPMInQ"]YouTube - Coolant Taig[/ame]

    Here is mine:

    -Speed

  5. #25
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    ah i tought you made your own mist cooling system
    The opinions expressed in this post are my own. -Les opinions exprimé dans ce messages sont les mienne

  6. #26
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    I have'nt actually tried this yet, but, I got me a unit from MicroMark that looks perfect for small mills and lathes. It comes with a small pump, a small but strong magnetic stand, and various other things of interest, tank, tubing, nozzles, coolant and such. The most important things are; It's small, and, low cost, around $50.00 I think for the whole shebang. Check this out it may save some of us the inevitable failure of trial and error.

  7. #27
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    ATAxy- It's not mist, it's flood, duh. But I did make it though. I made a few things on it.


    -Speed

  8. #28
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    i did notice it was flood, its just that since everybody was talking about mist i tought you where saying you made your own mist setup
    The opinions expressed in this post are my own. -Les opinions exprimé dans ce messages sont les mienne

  9. #29
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    A mister might be easy enough to make using something like a spray nozzle from a bottle and a small air valve or regulator. Perhaps even using a small spray bottle as a reservoir. Fix the nozzle open. Add two or three pounds of air and you have a mister.
    Lee

  10. #30
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    I live in a very small NYC apartment with my TAIG placed right next to my bed. I do have an enclosure, but nevertheless, any liquid/coolant is out. I've recently purchased a small 1.3HP air compressor and a very-simply DIY with loc-line and air tubing to provides a means of chip removing during milling operations. Check out the details and pictures!) on my TAIG Blog: www.nyccnc.com

    Thanks!
    Tormach PCNC 1100, SprutCAM, Alibre CAD

  11. #31
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    I made a coolant mister out of an model airplane engine carburetor, it works fine. You can probably pick one up at a flea market pretty cheap.

  12. #32
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    You could set something up like an IV drip bag. Then you could regulate how much coolant you want to go into the airstream.

  13. #33
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    Is a coolant collection tray required?

    A question for those of you in this thread using fog buster or DIY versions.
    What do I need in the way of a coolant/drip collection tray using a fog buster type system?

    Currently I'm setting up a CNC'd X3 mill and have it sitting on a Formica bench top. I'm putting up guards round it and realised I need to be considering coolant methods and if/what I need to collect used coolant. Due to limited space I want to avoid a full flood system and keen on the fog buster droplet design. However I haven't been able to find any information on what collection system is necessary or if one is necessary.

    When using a fog buster system do I need a full wide base tray covering the whole bench like a flood system that requires draining excess coolant into a separate container? Will the worktable be enough with the drain on the end or will I need something in between the two?

    Without having seen one in operation it's hard to know what is required.
    Thanks.

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiwibum View Post
    A question for those of you in this thread using fog buster or DIY versions.
    What do I need in the way of a coolant/drip collection tray using a fog buster type system?

    Currently I'm setting up a CNC'd X3 mill and have it sitting on a Formica bench top. I'm putting up guards round it and realised I need to be considering coolant methods and if/what I need to collect used coolant. Due to limited space I want to avoid a full flood system and keen on the fog buster droplet design. However I haven't been able to find any information on what collection system is necessary or if one is necessary.

    When using a fog buster system do I need a full wide base tray covering the whole bench like a flood system that requires draining excess coolant into a separate container? Will the worktable be enough with the drain on the end or will I need something in between the two?

    Without having seen one in operation it's hard to know what is required.
    Thanks.
    With a properly functioning FogBuster type mister, you don't need *anything*. If you're collecting more than VERY small amounts of coolant, you're doing something wrong. I run a home-made FogBuster on a knee mill, and after running all day on the most aggressive cuts (1/2" wide, 1/2" deep, 30+IPM), there may be a few ounces of coolant collected in the T-slots. With the kind of cuts you can do on an X3, there should be virtually nothing.

    When properly adjusted, you should see just a few *very* small droplets of coolant skittering away from the tool, and the stream coming out of the nozzle should be virtually invisible. If you can see the stream coming out of the nozzle, or you're actually getting more than very small coolant accumulation anywhere, you've got it turned up too high.

    Regards,
    Ray L.

  15. #35
    Community Moderator Al_The_Man's Avatar
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    CNC, Mechatronics Integration and Custom Machine Design

    “Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.”
    Albert E.

  16. #36
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    Home built FB clone

    Thought I'd post a few pics of the Fog Buster style mister I built. I really haven't played with it enough to find the best pressure setting. Around 20psi works pretty well. It can push out a surprising blast of air for the low pressure. Easily adjust from all air to all fluid.

    The tanks is PVC pipe stuff. Should hold 2 gallons or so of mist fluid.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails mister1.jpg   mister2.jpg   mister3.jpg   tamk1.jpg  

    tank2.jpg  

  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by HimyKabibble View Post
    With a properly functioning FogBuster type mister, you don't need *anything*.
    Great thank you for your reply Ray. I'll continue on with the semi enclosure I'm making it should be just fine.

  18. #38
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    Here's a link to the directory with the zero fog mister plans (at the bottom) as mentioned in the other thread:

    http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/...retired_files/

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