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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Sep 2021
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    Question beginner router bits

    Hi all,

    What cheap router bits would you recommend for wood and nonferrous metals like aluminum brass or copper I am in Europe (Croatia).
    What are your experiences, what is worth buying as a beginner.
    Could you please post some links or brands or should i just go for the cheapest thing on eBay and plunge it deep

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Dec 2003
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    994

    Re: beginner router bits

    I don't know quite how much of a beginner you may be.So please understand if this seems like very basic advice but I would suggest getting some of the really cheap bits with tungsten carbide edges and begin by taking your designs and cutting them in foam until you are comfortable with all parts of the process and can be confident that the piece coming off the machine will be exactly as intended.At which point you can move to wood and gain a bit more experience.You don't mention the type of machine but I will caution that some of the feed rates recommended for commercial machines will run the risk of stalling either the spindle or steppers of a hobby machine ,unless you have got hold of something unusually powerful.Intentionally cutting metal on a router is something I have done very little of and can't offer advice beyond considering it as high speed machining of metal and if you look around there is an amount of information out there.

  3. #3

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    Sep 2021
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    3

    Arrow Re: beginner router bits

    First of all Thanks for your engagement and your reply
    It helps me refine my question.
    I am applying for self-employment funds and I need to specify what I am buying in two year business plan in advance.
    I need to plan bits supply for longer period or long enough period to not have gaps of money to buy or time without a bits.


    Quote Originally Posted by routalot View Post
    You don't mention the type of machine but I will caution that some of the feed rates recommended for commercial machines will run the risk of stalling either the spindle or steppers of a hobby machine ,unless you have got hold of something unusually powerful.
    I am planning to order 1212 (47''x47'') 3-axis CNC from china with i hope appropriately powerful steppers and 2.2Kw water cooled Spindle.
    I am aware I should be cautious with feed rates and depths of cut in the beginning.
    I think i will work hardwood mostly (V carving and then maybe 3d carving), then MDF, softwood and soft metals.

    Quote Originally Posted by routalot View Post
    I don't know quite how much of a beginner you may be.
    I am from woodworking family with CS degree. I worked with wood a lot (machine work mostly (circular saw ,planner, classic desk router, )), and i have a "feeling" for it, but maybe i am better with computers


    Quote Originally Posted by routalot View Post
    I don't know quite how much of a beginner you may be.
    I meant bits that are cheap enough I can buy two or more of each with a budget of $200 or $300 so I can plan a new order ahead of time as I live in Croatia and would probably have to wait shipment.
    I would prefer some Europe supplier for less shipment prices and quicker delivery, but elsewhere is OK as well.
    Bits i think i will need:
    1. up-cut 1/4''.
    2. down-cut 1/4''.
    3. 1/4'' ballnose
    4. 1/8'' ballnose
    5. 60 degrees V Bit
    6. 90 degrees V Bit
    7. Face mill for surfacing diameter 5CM (or other appropriate diameter)
    8 .Or anything else I might end up needing by using Vectric Aspire on your suggestion (maybe 30 degrees v bit).
    9. Bits for thin nonferrous metal plates, aluminum copper or brass. (wood is business priority)


    What is the difference between cheap and expensive e.g. tungsten carbide anyway? That i didn't have time to investigate and have little experience with? No need to answer this..

    Thank you

  4. #4
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    Re: beginner router bits

    I would add a 10mm or 1/2" flat tool for cleaning the lower surfaces of pockets and straight are usually less expensive than up-cut or down-cut.From the description of your past experience I would suggest spending a lot of time looking at the various software packages for two reasons.First of all you will need to create the objects to work on and the more basic software will cut outlines and pockets easily but may not work so well with 3D objects.Not all software will import all the file exchange formats and if somebody sends a STEP file when your system will only accept .stl then you may have a problem.Having found a package that seems to work then you absolutely need to try all the range of machining operations to see what happens and closely watch the simulations.At which point you will be ready to post process the operations and load the file on the router.Do you have any experience of this type of thing?

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Sep 2021
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    3

    Re: beginner router bits

    Quote Originally Posted by routalot View Post
    Do you have any experience of this type of thing?
    Just what i saw during my dive in the subject of shopping a router, and i payed good attention to CAD/CAM part. (maybe not good enough attention - i don't know what i don't know, right? )
    I was using Blender for [link]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iM3KBliGEOA[/link] that animation
    I worked on a CO2 Laser for few months in a souvenir shop, I understand vector/nodes/curves/objects part of vector tools.
    My concern is weather Aspire will have post-processor good enough for my china mach3 machine. Editing post processor and g code is what i didn't dive deep enough.



    Quote Originally Posted by routalot View Post
    I would suggest spending a lot of time looking at the various software packages for two reasons.First of all you will need to create the objects to work on and the more basic software will cut outlines and pockets easily but may not work so well with 3D objects.
    I tought Vectric Aspire is pretty good with 3D CAM and relatively easy to use. I used Corel a lot and plan to purchase essential package and import to Vectric over .eps format i beleive.
    I am planning to start with 2.5D and inlays which seems pretty good covered in Aspire.
    There is just too many of packages to try them all, but Aspire and Fusion are popping out most. Maybe i would even go for fusion360 if it was not subscription.
    Could you suggest some CAD/CAM package in price range of Aspire $2000?


    Thanks


    Quote Originally Posted by routalot View Post
    Not all software will import all the file exchange formats and if somebody sends a STEP file when your system will only accept .stl then you may have a problem.Having found a package that seems to work then you absolutely need to try all the range of machining operations to see what happens and closely watch the simulations.At which point you will be ready to post process the operations and load the file on the router.
    Regarding STEP file format first time i hear about it.I have industrial design friends who might help with format accommodation if needed, they also might be my customers.

  6. #6
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    Re: beginner router bits

    For most of what you describe you don't need Aspire.It would cost less to buy Vcarve Pro,which only has the small defect that it will only import stl files for 3D machining.Aspire may deal with other file types but costs more and if Vcarve is not enough,you can upgrade for the difference in cost rather than having to pay the full amount.I think they will both use the same post processor and it will be able to do what you need.After all,once the computer has produced the Gcode any limitation is likely to be within the controller.

    You might even be able to work with free software if you can deal with the learning curve of Freecad.It has a range of post processors-including Mach 3.So at no cost you can design and produce code for your intended machine.I will add that it isn't the easiest software to learn.Vcarve is quite easy to use if you have a little 2D CAD experience.It is important to verify that all the entities are joined and do not overlap.

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